A New Trump Drinking Game

Tonight, I watched the debate. During the debate, my family and I became a bit frustrated/amused by Donald Trump and his answers. You see, he has a problem. Any time he’s asked a question, he likes to change the subject and talk about something related or completely different. So, here is my thought:

Every time Donald Trump doesn’t answer a question with the actual answer, take a drink. If he actually directly answers the question, don’t drink anything. See how quickly you become drunk.

It’s too bad there isn’t another debate so this can be done. However, if anyone has recorded the debate, they can try this drinking game. If you haven’t seen the debate, but plan to, why not keep a score? You don’t have to drink, but see how many times you’d have to drink.

Anyone have another drinking game idea for the debates?

Getting Immersed in a Book

There’s something I absolutely love, and that’s getting immersed in a book. It doesn’t matter where I am, as long as my mind is in the book, and everything around me is shut out, I feel like I can get lost in a book. If the book is especially good, I want to stay there a long time.

There have been some books I can’t get enough of, and I don’t want to stop reading. Usually, the ones that I want to keep reading are longer series. I think the two that I feel comfortable in are the Pern series and Shannara series. I love the worlds they’re set in.

But books aren’t the only thing I can get immersed in. There are certain TV series and movies that pull me, as well. In particular, the Star Trek movies and the later Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes. Deep Space Nine does it to me, too.

How about you? Which books draw you in so much that you don’t want to leave? Let me know in the comments below.

Authors on YouTube

When you read books, have you ever wondered what the authors sound like? Today, as I was looking for how to pronounce an author’s name, I came across his channel and was able to discover how his name is pronounced. The author is George H. Sirois. It’s a French last name, but he’s American, so I had no idea how he pronounced it. I know the French pronunciation, and no, he doesn’t pronounce it the French way.

So, this had me wondering about other authors on YouTube. Here’s the result of my pondering.

Patrick Rothfuss has a channel, and here’s a really long video.

Brandon Sanderson also has a channel. And here’s his ice bucket challenge.

Hugh Howey has quite a few videos. This is his Wool Synopsis.

And look, Michael J. Sullivan has a channel. This is his oldest video.

There are more, of course. And I’d like to know about them. Are there any authors on YouTube that you watch? Share their channels below!

Week in Review – October 16, 2016

Changes are happening. In more than one way. Let’s just say I’m focusing on quality rather than quantity now. Curious? Well, find out!


Almost done!!! Finally. Redemption Ark by Alastair Reynolds is now at 97% done, and I’ll be finishing it the next day I work. Feels great to make progress!


This is not where quality or quantity is happening.


This is where quality is improving. But first, I’ve done 7 videos on my main channel and 6 videos on my vlog channel. Well, the 6th vlog will be up after this post. What I mean about quality is that I’ve now started using a title screen for my main channel’s videos. I think it looks better. End card will come soon, I promise! Also, I’m going to try to focus on making my videos at least 5 minutes long, but no longer than 10 minutes. This is ideal because YouTube searches like videos that are longer, while people like watching videos that are shorter than 10 minutes. So the 5 to 10 minute length is ideal for views and search results. I’ve also been studying about SEO (search engine optimisation) for YouTube, which I really need to improve.


Nothing. Major revamp coming!


Again, I haven’t done anything. Sometimes I just get myself too busy with one thing, and neglect others.

The Blog

This is the other place where quality is going to rule. I’ve stopped doing the twice a day blog posting! I’m still doing a blog post a day, and I’ll do more if I have something to say that is worth reading. This will allow me to focus more on quality posts and other things, like my videos. And eventually, my books!



The Next Week’s Goals

I’ll be doing a lot on SEO, as well as book reviews. I need to get my last three reviews up before my new review. Also, as part of the SEO thing, I’m going to start doing transcriptions of my videos for closed captioning. This will also help improve my videos’ search rankings, as they’ll be more searchable. I think I’ll also open them up to people making translations and subtitles for my videos if they want.

How was your week?

Emergency! Must Watch The Shannara Chronicles!

We’re changing our internet and cable provider next Friday. That means that all shows that have been recorded must be watched before we change, because it’s all saved on our current provider’s equipment.

So, I’ll be watching The Shannara Chronicles, all thirteen episodes of it, before the equipment is switched over. I guess Star Trek will be put on the back burner until then.

You may be wondering why we’re changing providers. Well, we’ll be getting higher bandwidth. Our current provider can’t give us higher speeds, apparently because it’s unavailable in our neighbourhood. They promised us they would have it available within a month, but that was three months ago. They didn’t deliver. So, new provider, and triple the bandwidth.

The Snow Doesn’t Stop! The Jay Dee Show 2

I hope you’re ready for more videos. It’s been an interesting week, including a lot more snow. I worked quite a bit, but I kept up with booktube. I researched and explored the literature of Algeria, and I enjoyed giving some shoutouts. Let’s take a look at my main channel‘s videos.

First up is a vlog-like video where I talk about some authors who behave badly.

And then we go on to find out about literature from Algeria.

Next up is a popular video of mine, my monthly booktuber shoutout video.

And then I started a new tag, one targeted toward the parent booktubers.

Nearly finished the From East to West series now. Finally, we have reached Canada!

Then I reviewed Terry Pratchett’s Guards! Guards!

And finally, I answered Authors Answer #15, talking about new media.

So, let’s move on to my vlog channel. It snowed again! Is it going to stop?

First of all is my daughter’s first time playing in the snow. You definitely need to watch her first snowball fight.

The next day, my wife and I encountered a creepy snowman.

Something happened on YouTube thanks to Casey Neistat, a big vlogger. Find out what happened.

My daughter told me about a Pokemon that she was pretending to be. It was absolutely hilarious!

And yes, it snowed again!

If you have any comments, please let me know below. I’ll be back with more videos next Saturday!

Authors Answer 102 – Graphic Literature

Comic books and graphic novels are very popular. Both children and adults read them. There are comics for children, comics and graphic novel for adults. Although they are filled with pictures, they encourage people to read. But are they literature?

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 102 – Do you consider comic books and graphic novels to be legitimate forms of literature?

Linda G. Hill

I’ve never actually read one, but why not?

Elizabeth Rhodes

Yes. They are legitimate storytelling mediums with their own styles. The presence of illustration does not change this. Comics have a history of not being taken seriously, but I don’t think anyone who still holds on to this view has taken a look at a comic or graphic novel from recent times. The mediums have come a long way.

D. T. Nova

Graphic novels, absolutely so.

There’s more of a continuum than a sharp definition of distinct categories, so whether most comics are “literature” has at least as much to do with definitions as it does with “legitimacy”.

Paul B. Spence

Literature? I suppose. I think they are legitimate ways to tell stories, but then so are video games and movies. Not sure I’d call any of them literature…

Gregory S. Close

Yes, but like any medium, some of it is better than others.  My fatigue with comic books and graphic novels began in my teen years, mostly around the depiction of women.  While there certainly are great female comic book characters, in general they are treated as Big Boobs in Spandex and it’s just so objectifying.  I noticed it more once I had daughters and realized how the female heroes were portrayed compared to their male counterparts.  I think changes are happening, but slowly, and the industry needs to do more with its female heroes (maybe starting with clothing them more, so that their appeal is based on character and not sex appeal).

Eric Wood

I do. I think they tell a story through image dialogue. It’s not a genre I ever got into, but I do believe they count as literature.

C E Aylett

I’m afraid I don’t consider them at all. They just don’t interest me. I don’t read them – I’m still unsure as to whether graphic refers to pictures or porn! LOL.

However, I don’t like using terms such as ‘legitimate’ when it comes to areas like this. It smacks of elitism, that one particular group can make a judgement call on behalf of the rest of us in accordance to rules they made up towards their specific tastes.

What we’re really talking about is the term ‘literature’ to mean a form of written art. (Technically, all texts that form and communicate ideas are literature!)

Graphic literature is so hybrid I don’t think you can make a judgement in such direct terms. The rules that apply to visual art or literary art cannot be applied to both in the same way. Graphic literature is an art all of its own and any ‘legitimacy’ should be one form of it ranked against another in the same form. A bit like commercial vs literary novels.

At a push, I guess I would compare graphic literature more in line with film. So, is script writing considered a ‘legitimate’ form of literature?

Tracey Lynn Tobin

Absolutely, yes. They are obviously a very different form of literature, being that the vast majority of the written words are dialogue, with the rest of the necessary information being portrayed by the imagery, but literature none-the-less.

Comics and graphic novels aim to do exactly the same thing that traditional novels do: tell a story. And to be quite honest, I’ve read some comics and graphic novels that accomplished that goal much more successfully than some traditional novels I’ve read.

Also, my personal opinion is that reading is a good thing regardless of the exact specifics of the material, so if someone wants to spend their time reading comics…go for it! It’s all literacy!

Beth Aman

They are definitely valid forms of story-telling.  Literature?  Who cares about literature.  If you have a story to tell, tell it in the best way you can.  If that’s a comic book or graphic novel, then there you go.

Jean Davis

I suppose so. Can’t say that I’m a big fan of either, but I have enjoyed one or the other from time to time. If pictures help get people reading, I’m not going to debate about the legitimacy.

H. Anthe Davis

About half of my recorded Goodreads entries are graphic novels or manga, so I absolutely consider them literature.  Setting aside such materials as the X-Men or the Justice League, which most people think of when the idea of comic books crops up, there’s the Sandman series — which won a literary award that was subsequently clarified to be not-for-comic-books — and such materials as Persepolis, Maus and Zahra’s Paradise, which tackle serious memoir- and literary issues that just happen to be best shown through illustration.  Sure, there are plenty of throwaway superhero stories in the genre — but 90% of every genre is throwaway crap.  Comics’ throwaway crap is just more visible because the visuals make them easier to translate to the screen, and the somewhat disjointed stories are more easily massaged into screenplays to support whatever the movie studios want.  Just like it’s hard to find literary mysteries under the pile of James Pattersons, it can be hard to find literary comics under the pile of Avengers and Batman — but they exist.

Jay Dee Archer

In general, I’ll say yes. Maybe my definition of literature is a bit broad, though. I consider it any form of print that use words to convey a story or a message, just as long as it isn’t just a scrap of paper. It should be a book, at least. Even short ones. But if I were to narrow my definition down to books that are written to tell a great story rather than to simply entertain, then it depends. There are a lot of comics that merely entertain and don’t even tell a story. Garfield, for example, although I love it, probably wouldn’t be considered literature. However, something like Sandman would be considered literature.

How about you?

Do you think comic books and graphic novels are literature? Let us know in the comments below.

The official blog of Jay Dee Archer. Exploring new worlds, real and fictional.