Astronomy Quick Facts – Anthe

Anthe is a very small moon of Saturn, and a member of the Alkyonides. It’s also known as Saturn XLIX. It was discovered by the Cassini Imaging Team on May 30, 2007. Very little is known about it.

AthneData

  • Mean radius: 1 km (estimated)
  • Mass: 5×1012 kg
  • Density: Unknown
  • Surface gravity: Unknown
  • Albedo: Unknown
  • Temperature: Unknown
  • Mean orbital radius: 197,700 km (semi-major axis)
  • Orbital period: 1.03650 d
  • Inclination: 0.1° to Saturn’s equator
  • Eccentricity: 0.001

Name Origin

Anthe is one of the Alkyonides. She was one of the seven daughters of Alcyoneus, who was killed by Heracles. When he died, they threw themselves into the sea and were changed into halcyons by Amphitrite.

5 Interesting Facts

1. It orbits between Mimas and Enceladus.

2. Its 10:11 mean-longitude resonance with Mimas causes its semi-major axis to vary by 20 km every 2 years.

3. The other Alkyonides, Methone and Pallene are in similar orbits, and they may have a similar origin, possibly a larger moon broken apart by a large impact.

4. The Anthe Ring Arc may be caused by micrometeoroid impacts on Anthe. This partial ring appears in the vicinity of Anthe.

5. It was the sixtieth confirmed moon of Saturn.

Not much is known about this moon, but there are several images available. Here’s another one with the ring arc.

Anthe-ring

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2 thoughts on “Astronomy Quick Facts – Anthe”

  1. I have to comment on this one because it’s my middle name! Good show on including the Greek mythological origin. I’d been vaguely aware that there were moons or planetoids out there with this group of names, but hadn’t ever looked into which or where. Good to know.

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