Let’s Talk About Sports

Reading and writing seem like such inactive activities. Just sitting and reading or writing. But do any of you like to do sports?

These days, I enjoy hiking and walking long distance. I’ve walked 35 km in one day once, and many times between 10 and 15 km. That’s actually pretty normal for me now.

In the past, I’ve done a variety of sports. From 8 to 12 years old, I played hockey. My first year was as defence, while the other three years were at right wing. Around the end of elementary school, I started playing golf and skiing, as well. In grade nine, I joined the ski club at junior high school. I played a bit of volleyball, as well. But going into high school, I continued golfing, then mostly went on a break from pretty much any sport in university and after.

As for watching, I still enjoy watching hockey. I’m excited about Edmonton’s new arena downtown, and I’m looking forward to seeing the Edmonton Oilers play there starting next year. I also like watching the Olympics when I can. But while living in Japan, I developed a liking for sumo. I haven’t watched recently, but I followed many of the rikishi.

So how about you? Do you do or watch any sports?

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Finding Dinosaurs in Alberta

Ever wonder where you could go to see dinosaur fossils in Alberta? Well, here’s a list of places you can see plenty of them.

Royal Tyrrell Museum

Probably one of the best places in the world to see dinosaurs, this incredible museum in Drumheller is one of my favourite places. It’s in the heart of the badlands, an amazing treasure trove of dinosaur fossils that you can even go out and look for yourself. There are tours available where you can help dig up dinosaur bones for 90 minutes at a time. The museum itself has a huge number of skeletons and fossils on display, and well worth the visit to this town.

Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum

Near Grande Prairie and my hometown of Beaverlodge is this new museum set to open this fall. It’s located near the Pipestone Creek bone bed, which has unveiled a few different kinds of dinosaurs, many of which still have to be excavated. Phil Currie has also been very instrumental in the Royal Tyrrell Museum, and is a palaeontology professor at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

Royal Alberta Museum

Located in Edmonton, this is one of the largest museums in Alberta, and it does have some dinosaurs on display. Although not as impressive as Royal Tyrrell’s collection, it’s worth seeing this museum, mainly because of its very good natural history exhibition. This museum is actually going to be closing soon, but will reopen in downtown Edmonton in late 2017 or early 2018. It will be western Canada’s largest museum.

Devil’s Coulee Dinosaur & Heritage Museum

Located southeast of Lethbridge is this museum dedicated to the local finds, especially hadrosaurs. Though not well-known, this is probably worth a visit, especially if you want to see some dinosaur eggs.

These are the main museums throughout Alberta with dinosaur fossils, but there are other attractions related to dinosaurs. I’ll cover them another time. But if you want to see dinosaurs, Alberta is one of the best places in the world.