Astronomy Quick Facts – Arche

Arche is a very small moon of Jupiter’s, and is a member of the Carme group. It’s also known as Jupiter XLIII. It was discovered by a team of astronomers led by Scott S. Sheppard at the University of Hawaii in 2002. Very little is known about it.

Arche

Data

  • Mean radius: 1.5 km
  • Mass: Unknown
  • Density: Unknown
  • Surface gravity: Unknown
  • Albedo: Unknown
  • Temperature: Unknown
  • Mean orbital radius: 23,717,000 km (semi-major axis)
  • Orbital period: 746.185 d (retrograde)
  • Inclination: 162° to Saturn’s equator
  • Eccentricity: 0.149

Name Origin

Arche was the fourth of the muses of origin. She was one of the five Boeotian muses. She is one of the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne.

5 Interesting Facts

1. Arche is a member of the Carme group, which orbits retrograde and at a highly inclined and eccentric orbit. Probably a captured asteroid.

2. Its original temporary designation was S/2002 J 1.

3. It’s pronounced ar-kee.

4. Sheppard has been involved in the discovery of 75 moons.

5. There’s very little known about Arche. I can’t do five interesting facts.

With such a highly inclined and eccentric orbit, and such a small size, it’s unlikely we’ll see any kind of exploration of this moon any time soon.

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4 thoughts on “Astronomy Quick Facts – Arche”

  1. Jupiter has always held a mystery for me. It’s the largest planet in our solar system, yet it’s comprised mainly of gas. What boggles my mind is how it can have the mass it has given it’s gaseous state. Like I said, it’s been a mystery for me since I was a kid.

    1. It’s very well-understood why it’s so massive. The core is solid, and larger than the Earth. Outside that, it’s a very exotic liquid metallic hydrogen. Then the rest is gas. The central core is quite dense due to the pressures from gravity. It’s rocky and metallic.

      As a planet, Jupiter is my favourite, but I’m liking Saturn’s moons.

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