Obstacles in the Immigration Process

Well, it was bound to happen. We have our first problem with the immigration process.

We received an email today from the Manila office today. I guess that’s the good news. They got the application package. And they looked through it quickly. And they immediately told us they most likely would not approve it because they don’t believe I’ll be living in Canada.

When we applied in the beginning, they needed proof that I would live in Canada when the permanent residency began. Of course, permanent residency starts the moment my wife receives the visa while we’re in Canada, or the moment she arrives in Canada after receiving the visa. So, in either case, they need proof that I’ll be going to Canada with her or before her. They have that in the form of a rental agreement for where we’ll be living.  I guess that’s not enough. But, fear not, we do have something else. Proof of my flight to Canada! We have 45 days to get it to them in Manila, and once that’s done, they will resume processing the application.

I’m not terribly worried. This is just a little setback that can be quickly resolved.

Teuchi Udon Jiyuseki – Niku Udon and Maitake Tempura

Today, after nearly five years of living in this neighbourhood, we decided to try out the nearest restaurant to our home, Teuchi Udon Jiyuseki. It’s an udon restaurant that makes their own udon noodles. It’s very popular, but is only open for lunch between 11:30 am and 2:30 pm.

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The exterior is interesting. It looks like a log cabin.

One of the reasons we decided to go today was this:

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This restaurant is included in this year’s Michelin Guide for Yokohama, Kawasaki, and Shonan.

That’s right. It’s in the Michelin Guide for Yokohama, Kawasaki, and Shonan this year! We had to go.

My order turned out to be a lot bigger than I expected. First, I started with the dashimaki tamago, which is fried egg cooked in light soup. It was 200 yen.

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The egg comes with grated daikon radish.

My main dish was the niku udon, or meat udon. It came with beef, onions, fish cake, seaweed, and tempura batter, and was in a light soy sauce based soup. On the side were two pickles. It was 800 yen.

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Niku udon with a side of pickles.

And my final dish was maitake tempura, which is a mushroom called hen-of-the-woods in English. It also came with a piece of goya tempura, or bitter melon. It was 350 yen.

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Maitake tempura and goya tempura.

Starting with the egg, it was very good. I love this type of egg. It’s got an extra flavour from the soup it’s cooked with.

The udon was served at the perfect temperature. It wasn’t too hot. The noodles were handmade, and were not too soft, not too firm. They were just right. The meat was good, as well. I ordered the 300 gram serving of noodles, but it really filled me up.

The tempura was delicious. I’ve found that maitake is one of my favourite mushrooms, so I just had to have it. It was actually a special dish, which is not on the regular menu. It turned out to be very filling. It also came with a green salt, and I really don’t know why it’s green.

Overall, it was a very delicious and filling lunch. It was quite reasonable. It’s open for only 3 hours a day, and it serves lunch to a lot of local workers, so it gets busy around then. It’s best to go early, like we did. It’s also a small restaurant, so there aren’t many tables, and there is counter seating. I liked how it looked inside, very much like a log cabin.

The restaurant can be found in the Ishikawa area of Fujisawa city.

You can visit their Facebook page, as well. Apparently, someone working there (the chef?) can speak English.