Choose My Best Instagram Photos – Round 1, Group 24

You’re in for a treat this time. You’re going to see some rather unique architecture, as well as a very orange sunset. Definitely some more interesting photos in this group, and more in the future.

The rules are simple. I post 10 of my Instagram photos every few days, and you get to vote on your favourites. It’s multiple choice, so please vote for 2 to 4 photos (3 is ideal). Leave a comment saying why you voted the way you did. The poll comes after the photos.

Here are the photos.

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River

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The world

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Public art

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The world behind glass mountains

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Mt Fuji sunset from Yokohama, no filter

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One going up, one going down

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Mild air conditioned car – Sotetsu Line

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Stairs going up

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Smoking next to the no smoking sign

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Stairs down

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And now the vote. Please vote for your favourite photos (ideally 3, but anywhere between 2 and 4):

Thank you very much for the votes. Please leave a comment with your reasons for voting the way you did. I’m curious about how people feel about the pictures.

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Ever Seen a Rocket Stage Separation? Not Like This!

It’s common to see video of rocket stage separations. Rockets have video cameras installed in them so you can watch the separation. Engineers use the video footage to analyse how well the separation happened, and to discover any problems. It’s very useful in failed separations. But take a look at this video of a UP Aerospace launch for NASA to launch the Maraia Earth Return Capsule.

The following video focuses on the separation as viewed from outside the rocket. You can see slow motion, which is quite interesting.

I’ve never seen a stage separation from that angle before. What did you think?