C Is for Canada Goose

What other bird says “Canada” to you? Maybe the loon? Well, how about the Canada goose? For the letter C, I am talking about the Canada goose! Check out the video, which includes some bonus video of a v-formation I managed to catch.

And here are the facts. How many did you know?

  1. This large goose is native to the arctic and temperature regions of North America.
  2. It’s been introduced to other parts of the world, including the UK, New Zealand, Argentina, and Chile.
  3. They are extremely successful at adapting to human habitation, so they are a very common bird around cities and towns, now having a population of between 4 and 5 million.
  4. There are 7 subspecies of Canada goose.
  5. They range from 75 to 120 cm in length and have a wingspan of between 127 and 185 cm.
  6. In most bird species, sexual dimorphism is apparent in the differences between male and female bird appearance, but the male and female Canada goose are virtually identical, except for a small difference in weight. Females are smaller.
  7. They spend their summers throughout Canada and the northern United States, but breed in the southern US and northern Mexico.
  8. Canada geese eat mainly plants, but have been known to eat insects and fish. And sometimes they scavenge from garbage cans.
  9. They fly in a v-formation at around 1 km in altitude, but have been known to fly as high as 9 km.
  10. Canada geese are monogamous, mating for life. If one dies, then they can find another mate. They’re very faithful birds.

Let me know in the comments below which facts you didn’t know about or were the most surprised about.

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10 thoughts on “C Is for Canada Goose”

    1. I keep approaching geese to see if they try to attack me. But I approach slowly, so I don’t threaten them. A couple weeks ago, I talked to one for about a minute. It didn’t move.

  1. I knew six of the facts; I did not know the precise numbers of altitude, population, and wingspan. Every winter a gaggle of Canadian geese hang out in a ponding basin one block from our house. I love it–they are fascinating creatures to observe. Thanks for the video.

  2. Didn’t know most of them! Fascinating that they mate for life. When we lived in Virginia we had a flock that would visit for a while in the field across the street from our house. Not sure if they wintered there or were just stopping over along their way further south. Was pretty cool. Especially since my wife is Canadian, too 🙂

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