Tag Archives: dinosaurs

TV Impression – Walking With Dinosaurs

WalkingwithdinosdvdcoverWalking With Dinosaurs

Series length: 6 episodes

Genre: Documentary

Going in chronological order, I watched this after Walking With Monsters. However, it was made several years earlier, in 1999. And it looks dated. Even though it was the most expensive documentary ever made at the time, the CG looks like CG. Jurassic Park was much better. That’s what stood out to me the most. The movement was a bit unnatural, and the dinosaurs didn’t seem to fit in with the real locations that they used.

But I enjoyed it. It was fascinating, just like the other series. But as it is dated, none of the dinosaurs had feathers. But that’s just a nitpick. They did mention that dinosaurs evolved into birds, so there’s that. Like Walking With Monsters, I found the environments interesting. The world changed so much during the time of the dinosaurs, from hot and tropical to hot and dry. Even Antarctica had forests when it was at the South Pole. Dinosaurs lived there and they adapted to the dark, cold winters.

But it wasn’t all about dinosaurs. It was also about the marine reptiles, like icthyosaurs and pliosaurs. And there was an episode about pterosaurs. They featured mammals, sharks, and the occasional amphibian, too.

At only half an hour each episode, it’s an easy series to watch in a short time. If you love dinosaurs, you’ll probably love this.

Mission Statement – Science

Here is the second part of the blog’s mission statement. And this time, we move into reality. Less geeky, more nerdy.

I have a very long history with science. From the very beginning when I got encyclopedias, I started reading them, especially for the science and geography entries. I also read a lot of dinosaur and astronomy books. In university, I studied physics and astronomy, though I included a couple geology classes and an atmospheric science class. I haven’t stopped reading about science. On this blog, I started the Encyclopedia Entries series, but have changed it to Quick Facts, as they’re designed to be easy to read and you’re able to find facts quickly. I also talk about various current events in science, especially related to astronomy and space exploration.

As for Quick Facts, this is what is currently planned:

Astronomy

I’m currently going through the moons of the solar system in alphabetic order. In the future, I may focus on constellations and major stars.

Space Exploration

I’m going to go through all of the space probes, both successful and unsuccessful, that were sent to study other bodies in the solar system. I’ll do them in chronological order.

Geography

I will be going through all of the countries in alphabetic order, then move on to Canadian provinces and territories, Japanese prefectures, American states, and Australian states. I may do more.

Palaeontology

I’ll be covering all of the dinosaurs in alphabetic order, which may take a long time. After that, I may take a look at pterosaurs, icthyosaurs, mosasaurs, and plesiosaurs. And I may go further back in time, too.

Zoology

I’d like to go through the birds of North America. I was often fascinated by birds, which we now know are modern dinosaurs. So, why not include them?

Beyond these, I will have to see what comes up in the future. Who knows, I may look at geology, volcanoes, or even take a look at history in some way.

One thing I’d like to do with these is have a weekly schedule to post them. It’ll either be once or twice a week. I’ll have to see which is best.

So, what are you most interested in seeing? Let me know in the comments below.

What Would Your Youthful Library Record Say About You?

Over at newauthoronline, Kevin Morris posted about his childhood library record as a reaction to this article posted on The Guardian’s website. Well, I have something to say, too.

While the other responses are mainly about fiction, I rarely read fiction as a child. I was always interested in dinosaurs and space, so you could always find me in the non-fiction and science section of the library. The Stony Plain Public Library saw me checking out this one book in particular many times. I don’t remember the title, but it was a very impressive book about dinosaurs that contained diagrams and drawings of skeletons and skulls. I’d spend hours tracing over the bone illustrations to give a fully-fleshed picture of the dinosaurs. I wanted them to match the shape of the skull closely, so I could see what they really looked like. Of course, we now know many theropods had feathers, but back in the late eighties, we had no idea.

That is the book that stands out for me. I don’t recall what else I checked out, but they almost always involved science. This showed how much I loved science, and still do. I was a nerdy little kid, even though I didn’t have the stereotypical look.

So, what does your childhood/teenage library record look like? Leave your comments below!

Share Your Geekiness

I am a geek. I’ll admit that quite honestly. Anyone who knows me knows that I like a few geeky things. Let’s take a look.

Star Trek

I am a big Star Trek fan, and have been since the late 80s. I’ve been to a few conventions, but never dressed up in costume for it. I bought a lot of books, including technical manuals and starship guides. I even have the Klingon Dictionary.

Dinosaurs

Ever since I was a little kid, I’ve loved dinosaurs. Still do. They were more of a mystery back in the 80s, but so much more is known about them that we have come to accept that dinosaurs never disappeared. They’re still with us in the form of birds.

Weather

I keep track of the weather daily. I’m fascinated by the long-term trends, as well as the short-term fluctuations. I keep a record on another blog, 365 Rotations.

Space

Well, considering this was what I studied in university, I’m not so sure if I should include this as being a geek thing. But I love anything to do with space, space exploration, astronomy, and so on.

Science Fiction and Fantasy

This is more of a book thing, but I also love movies and TV series that are sci-fi or fantasy. Love Pern, Shannara, A Song of Ice and Fire, and more. But you should know this, considering what I usually talk about on this blog. I even got goosebumps when I watched the new Star Wars trailers.

Geography

I love maps and geography. I love city planning, how countries use the land, how the landscape shapes countries and towns, how relations with other countries affects the course of history, etc. It’s all very interesting to me.

Computer Games

Many of the games I enjoy are geeky by nature. SimCity 4, The Sims 2, Civilization series, and I am eagerly awaiting No Man’s Sky. I love RPGs and MMORPGs, but found I didn’t have the time required to dedicate to them.

Transformers

I watched the cartoons as a kid, loved the original movie, and then later bought the entire series on DVD as an adult. I will watch it again and again. The live action movies are a travesty, though. It just feels like the whole series was gutted.

There are so many more things I could go into. I have too many interests to ever get bored.

So, now it’s your turn. Share your geeky side in the comments below!

Going to a Theme Restaurant

Last month, a new restaurant opened in Yamato, just north of Fujisawa, the city I live in. It’s a dinosaur themed restaurant. While my sister is here, we’re going to eat there.

Japan has a few themed restaurants. There’s a ninja restaurant in Tokyo that you need to reserve more than two weeks ahead. There’s a Gundam themed restaurant in Tokyo, as well.

Have you ever eaten at a themed restaurant?

Finding Dinosaurs in Alberta

Ever wonder where you could go to see dinosaur fossils in Alberta? Well, here’s a list of places you can see plenty of them.

Royal Tyrrell Museum

Probably one of the best places in the world to see dinosaurs, this incredible museum in Drumheller is one of my favourite places. It’s in the heart of the badlands, an amazing treasure trove of dinosaur fossils that you can even go out and look for yourself. There are tours available where you can help dig up dinosaur bones for 90 minutes at a time. The museum itself has a huge number of skeletons and fossils on display, and well worth the visit to this town.

Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum

Near Grande Prairie and my hometown of Beaverlodge is this new museum set to open this fall. It’s located near the Pipestone Creek bone bed, which has unveiled a few different kinds of dinosaurs, many of which still have to be excavated. Phil Currie has also been very instrumental in the Royal Tyrrell Museum, and is a palaeontology professor at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

Royal Alberta Museum

Located in Edmonton, this is one of the largest museums in Alberta, and it does have some dinosaurs on display. Although not as impressive as Royal Tyrrell’s collection, it’s worth seeing this museum, mainly because of its very good natural history exhibition. This museum is actually going to be closing soon, but will reopen in downtown Edmonton in late 2017 or early 2018. It will be western Canada’s largest museum.

Devil’s Coulee Dinosaur & Heritage Museum

Located southeast of Lethbridge is this museum dedicated to the local finds, especially hadrosaurs. Though not well-known, this is probably worth a visit, especially if you want to see some dinosaur eggs.

These are the main museums throughout Alberta with dinosaur fossils, but there are other attractions related to dinosaurs. I’ll cover them another time. But if you want to see dinosaurs, Alberta is one of the best places in the world.

A Surprise Encounter With Dinosaurs

Today, we were in the Keikyu Department Store in Kamiooka, Yokohama, and we did some shopping and lunch. But then we found out there were some dinosaurs in the building. We had to check them out. In fact, on the floor we ate on, there was a Stegosaurus skeleton. I didn’t get a picture of it, mainly because it wasn’t easy to get a good view of it. However, we found out there were other skeletons on other floors. We went to seek them out.

Our next skeleton was Japan’s own Fukuiraptor. It was a big raptor, one I wouldn’t want to run into. My daughter is 93 cm tall, just for reference.

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Fukuiraptor and my daughter. The dinosaur is the one without skin and musculature.

Then we went down another two floors and found the next dinosaur. It was a big one! And it’s from western North America. It was a Triceratops.

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Again, my daughter in front of a dinosaur. This time, a Triceratops.
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Only the Triceratops with me standing this time.

There was another thing to check out behind the Triceratops, the femur of an Apatosaurus.

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Apatosaurus femur and my daughter next to a dinosaur professor.

But that’s not all! We found some dinosaur artwork on the same floor, a Triceratops bursting through the wall.  My daughter was scared of it, and wouldn’t go near it.

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The blur is my daughter running away.

Despite my daughter running away from the Triceratops picture, she enjoyed seeing the dinosaurs. Now she knows a new word, and I hope I have a big fan of dinosaurs. We’re moving to Alberta next year, which is one of the best places in the world to see dinosaurs. I hope she’ll love it.