Tag Archives: editing

Writing and Editing Services on Fiverr

Has anyone ever used Fiverr for anything? It’s a great way to find cheap and quick services for just about anything, from creating logos to getting voiceovers to editing services. Well, I’ve joined Fiverr.

I’m now offering a couple of services. One is blog and article writing. With my experience in blogging and writing articles, if you’d like my services, then please check out my gig on writing.

The other service is proofreading and editing. I will track edits, correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and smooth out those awkward sentences. I will not change content or tone, though. I’ve had plenty of experience editing and proofreading in my time as an English teacher, as we offered those services. I have edited a book (and parts of other books), magazine articles, and even scientific papers. My offers are for 1000, 2000, or 5000 word documents, though it can be customized. And since I’m familiar with both American and British spelling, I can adapt to either one. So, if you’re interested in my proofreading and editing services, check out that gig.

I’m dedicated to doing these jobs accurately and with a quick turnaround time.

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How to Resume Writing After a Hiatus

One of these days, I’m going to get back to writing. As I’ve mentioned before, I don’t have any privacy to be able to do any serious writing at the moment. But, I will. To prepare, I need to do a few things.

Have a place

When the room in the basement is ready for me to put my computer on the desk and a chair to sit on, I’ll be there! Once it’s all ready, I can start writing.

Re-read what I’ve written

I need to get myself back into my world. I have to completely reacquaint myself with the story. Actually, I don’t need to do that, since I know it by heart. However, by reading, I get my mind back into it, and I can rediscover the feeling.

Prepare my maps

I have a lot of maps. By going over the maps, I can explore my world again and live there in my mind. There’s still a lot to develop.

Notes, notes, notes

I need to review my notes and write more notes. I need to write notes on all the characters, all the places, all the story lines, everything.

Update my author website

I need to add some content to my author website. In particular, I want to get the Ariadne Encyclopedia started. It’ll be my online reference guide for the world. I plan to have character profiles, country profiles, and star system information available.

Write and edit

I actually have several parts written but not up on the website yet. However, I need to get them critiqued and edit them. I also need to write my novel, not just Journey to Ariadne.

Keep everyone updated

I want to keep my readers updated in several ways. One is, through this blog. Another is on YouTube. Another is through my Facebook page. And the other big one is Twitter. Eventually, once I have a Goodreads author page, I’ll be updating that, too.

There’s a lot to do, but I’ll get it done. If you write, what do you do to prepare? Let me know in the comments below.

Book Unboxing and Video Editing

I edited and posted a video today about my book collection. Since we moved to Canada, my books have stayed in boxes, and I haven’t had anywhere to unpack them. But I decided to show my (reduced) book collection on video. This involved taking 36 short videos and editing them together. More on that after. First, watch the video.

Now that you’ve watched it, I’ll tell you a bit about the process. I used Windows Movie Maker to edit the 36 clips together and add text. I’ve never done a video with so many clips. And although there were 36 clips, the video is relatively short. It started out with about 6 minutes and 30 seconds of video, but after editing out all the unnecessary bits (my arm moving to start and stop the video, mistakes, silence), it was cut down to 4 minutes and 6 seconds. That’s quite a bit cut. But it was a lot of cutting to do!

Anyway, I hope you enjoyed the video. Let me know in the comments below if you’ve read any of the books.

You’re Probably Using Too Much Space After a Period

periodspacingI’ve been doing it wrong. Actually, I know I’ve been doing it wrong for a long time. You see the space after the period in these sentences? Double spaced. It used to be pretty standard. It was used to make sentences appear more separated. I was taught to do it that way.

You see, I was taught to type on a typewriter. When I started typing in school, we didn’t use computers with word processors. We used electric typewriters. And since their wasn’t variable spacing for the letters, and we only had one font, we used a double space after the periods. I got used to doing that.

These days, word processing software has made this obsolete. In fact, using a single space has been standard for many years. There was no need for me to learn to use a double space. But over the years, I was using a double space because that’s what I was taught and I was used to. Out of habit, I’d been using double spaces while knowing it was wrong.

Now, I’m typing with single spaces after the period. What about you? Do you use single or double spaces?

Changes Coming to Amazon’s Kindle

Publishing to Amazon’s Kindle has been easy for anyone to do, and has flooded the market with self-published eBooks. They range from professionally well-done to amateurishly horrible. Amazon wants to solve the problem of substandard eBooks.

eNovel Authors at Work posted a great article about the changes and what they mean to the average indie author. To get yourself familiar with what’s happening, I suggest you read it. It may make life easier for you.

The changes come into effect in February and will affect indie authors, small publishers, online publishers, and boutique publishers. This does not affect traditional publishers who concentrate on print books. When there are errors in the book, such as spelling mistakes, grammar mistakes, formatting issues, and just plain poor quality, the book will be flagged and taken offline. The author is then notified and asked to fix the problems before it can be published again. Even one complaint by a reader can result in a book being pulled. Thankfully, fixing the issues is easy, especially if it’s just a spelling or grammar mistake. In fact, Amazon will tell you exactly where the errors are. Sometimes, they’ll be foreign words. Fair enough, those don’t need to be changed. Before publishing, you can even use Kindle’s online proofer to find the mistakes. If there are no problems, publish away!

My worries are probably minor, but what if a book is constantly being tagged as poor quality because of technobabble, magic words, or unique names that the author has made up? I’d hope that wouldn’t be an issue.

On the positive side, this will force authors to make sure their books are good quality. It may discourage the lazy or unmotivated authors from publishing substandard books. They may try anyway, and get frustrated. I could see the number of books published this year decreasing because they’re prevented from publishing their error-riddled novels.

As always, I’m a wait and see kind of person. I’m interesting in seeing how this goes. What do you think? Do you agree with the new rules? Or do you have any worries? Let me know in the comments.

There’s a New Post Editor!

I’d been using the old editor for quite some time. Then last year, a new editor appeared that lacked the functionality of the old one, and for some reason, only gave me the ability to see three lines in the text field. It was irritating. It only gave me a full view when I edited existing posts. It was fine for that, but not for making new posts. So, I continued using the old editor which is available on the old WP Admin Dashboard.

Well, there’s a new editor! And how does it look? It actually looks pretty good.  I like it. I may actually use it. I’m using it right now just to test it. Improvements over the previous “new” editor include a full list of categories and how they’re structured, larger visual editor, cleaner appearance, and far easier to use.

But, there’s a problem. There’s no option for adding a poll. I wonder why it hasn’t been included. I guess it’s time to visit WordPress forums and ask about it!

What do you think of the new editor?

Authors Answer 48 – Writing and Publishing Isn’t All Fun

It’s the final month of the first year of Authors Answer! By the end of this month, we will have been doing this for a full year. 52 questions answered. I’m glad to have gotten this far. It’s been a lot of fun. But, this question isn’t all about having fun. No, writing and publishing has its difficult side. Authors tend to have some aspect of writing that they hate, or at least dislike. I call this the dark side of writing.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 48 – What’s your least favourite part of the writing and publishing process?

H. Anthe Davis

Right now, I would say the rough draft phase, since I’m currently in it and it is driving me slowly insane.  I have mountains of notes, but translating them from nebulous ideas to coherent text is always difficult, and it ends up feeling like I’m just throwing putty against a wall and hoping it will stick in some sort of pattern.  Not having a clear sense of where I’m headed is disheartening — even though I know I’ll suss it out soon enough.

When I’m not in the middle of a new work, though, marketing is definitely the worst.  Which is why I don’t do nearly enough.

S. R. Carrillo

I’m certain I’m not alone when I say I like marketing the least. As a writer, I’m an inherently introverted person. I crave alone time and not standing out, most of the time. Marketing a book requires all sort of extroversion that I occasionally cower at the thought of. Expose my heart and soul to the general public? Entice total stranger to dissect my innards? HOW COULD I EVER?

But then I do it, and it still sucks, but it’s really not that bad. It’s a mental thing is all. And, sometimes, that can be the worst part of it all.

Paul B. Spence

The business side. I love to write, but I hate the business of selling.

Caren Rich

I really enjoy the planning and plotting. It’s such an adventure to start with an idea and build a world populated with characters you’ve created. Granted they don’t always behave as you would like, but that can be fun as well.

Elizabeth Rhodes

I despise the editing part of the process.  It’s a necessary evil, but it’s also the one part of the process that makes you question all your knowledge and skills.  “What’s that?  How did I miss the question mark at the end of this sentence?  How did I use the wrong ‘your?’ I know better than that!  This whole paragraph is garbage, just delete it all.  I can’t send this to a beta, they’ll laugh at all the mistakes I didn’t catch!”

Eric Wood

My least favorite part is sending out my manuscript to publishers. The reason I’m not published yet is because the book I’ve written (co-written to be more precise) has been rejected a dozen times. We didn’t go through an agent. We simply sent it straight to the publishers.

Allen Tiffany

I do not enjoy the traditional publishing route. Been there, almost done it. Did not like it.

To be specific, I once sent a manuscript to a publisher after taking a year to write my first novel. This was back in the day…I sent the whole thing unsolicited, printed out and placed in a box. They loved it, offered me contracts for it and two more, and then we went to work editing. And more editing. And plans for a pub date a year in the future, and then they killed their fiction line. So I found an agent and started over. Two years later, after a couple near misses with other publishers, both my agent and I gave up on it. So nothing to show for three years of stress and strain, of which almost none of it had anything to do with writing.

So at this point I’m all about self-publishing, and I really do enjoy all aspects of writing and publishing. Certainly parts of it can get tedious. For instance, before I published my first novella, I surely read through it over 50 times, which got very tiring, and another ten times after my editor made her changes. And researching keywords for loading in the Amazon book setup is a heck of a way to spend a sunny Saturday afternoon. On the other hand, I recognize the value of doing both of these things well, and I get excited when I do them well, when I make little discoveries that can help me tell a tale in a more engaging way, or when I figure out how to help my book show up in relevant searches.

The thing I don’t like about the entire process is that there is never enough time to do all of it, especially to do it all as well as I’d like.

Jean Davis

I have to say my least favorite part of the whole publication process is the waiting. Waiting on submissions, waiting to hear from editors on edits, waiting to hold the finished piece in my hands. Mostly, I suppose it’s waiting on all the things that are not in my personal control. I have this issue outside of writing too, which might make me a little bit of a control freak. Maybe.

D. T. Nova

Probably one of the parts I haven’t gotten to yet.

But out of what I have done, I can’t say I like writing about myself, which is a necessary part of promoting my own work.

Gregory S. Close

Honestly, the hardest part of the writing process for me is getting the first draft of a story down.  I tend to obsess over the small details of a first draft, which makes for a fairly clean first draft but also delays the creative flow of ideas to paper/screen.  Once ideas are on the page I feel immense relief and actually enjoy editing and honing them for the audience.

Tracey Lynn Tobin

Well, the very first thing that came to my mind was marketing, because I’ve spoken before on how much I damn well hate having to deal with marketing myself. But then I thought, marketing isn’t really part of the “writing and publishing process”…that comes afterward. So what’s my least favourite part of writing/publishing? Well, I’ll probably have to go with final editing. Some people don’t mind it, but I think it’s a pretty universally hated part of writing because by the time you’ve gotten to final edits you’ve had to re-read your own work a dozen or more times and you’ve gotten to the point where you’re genuinely starting to hate it. Even if you thought it was awesome before, by the time you get to final edits you start to feel like tossing the whole thing into a fire.

At least, that’s how I feel. lol

Linda G. Hill

At the moment I’d have to say trying to figure out how to go about getting published. It seems like a maze with things to do at every corner but I’m never sure I’m going the right way and whether I’m doing it in the right order. I hope once I’ve got it figured out the second time will be easy.

Jay Dee Archer

I haven’t gone very far, but I can see how marketing can be rather daunting. I’m getting practice with marketing my blog with some success, but it’s still an uphill battle. I like writing, I don’t mind the editing process, I love the worldbuilding and character creating. But I think trying to get the word out and actually sell my book are the most difficult things. I’m not certain if I’m a good salesperson. It would be nice if it just sold itself, but that’s not the way it works. From what I’ve heard, writing is only ten percent of the word. The other ninety percent is marketing and selling.

How about you?

If you’re a writer, what do you find the most difficult aspect of writing and publishing? If you’re not a writer, what do you think would be most difficult for you? Let us know in the comments below.