Tag Archives: fame

Authors Answer 142 – Becoming Famous

The vast majority of authors never become famous. They never have a bestseller. They are pretty much unknown. But many authors dream of making it big, becoming one of those authors who is a household name. But how would we handle that newfound fame?

Question 142 – How do you think you would handle fame if your books become as popular as authors like Stephen King?

C E Aylett

I’m a pretty sociable person so I’d probably be far too open for my own good! I’d also like to think I’d keep my feet on the ground and just keep on being me, with perks.

H. Anthe Davis

Authors are hardly rock stars, so I wouldn’t think the pressure of fame would be excessive. There would likely be convention appearances and book signings, so my antisocial little self might have trouble maintaining a pleasant face, but I’ve manned a sales booth before and it wasn’t so bad. All such things end in their time, just have to be nice and wait them out. I think the worst parts for me would be to have a spotlight and a deadline — fan-made or publisher-made. I don’t like to be pushed. Also I’d probably have to drop out of my Day Job, which would mean losing ruminating time and getting way too wrapped up in my own head… Of course, I’m hardly writing the Great American Novel, so I wouldn’t have a problem writing follow-ups in the same vein as my first popular work. So I think it would be a combination of gratifying and annoying, and make me a surly recluse when I’m not publisher-mandated to put on a smile and sell.

Tracey Lynn Tobin

It’s hard to say, honestly, because you can never really know how you’re going to react in any situation until you’ve been in it. I’d like to think that I’d react well. Being able to support my family with my writing – and subsequently spend more time focusing on my writing as well – is a dream of mine, so I think that I’d be extremely happy, at least to a certain degree.

At the same time, there are definitely downsides that I’m not sure I would deal with all that well. From my tiny, practically insignificant experience with “fame” through my YouTube channel, I’ve learned that having people claim to love and admire you can actually sometimes be very hard on the head in a number of ways. Additionally, growing larger and larger means you end up with more and more expected of you, and that kind of pressure can become like a crushing weight that exacerbates things like anxiety and depression.

So, I guess, without really knowing exactly how I would react, I expect that I’d probably be very happy, but also very stressed.

Eric Wood

If I became as famous as Stephen King (or JK Rowling, even) I would live it up. I would support causes that were important to me (like fighting cancer and making sure the world has access to clean water). I would also make sure I and my family were comfortable and without too many needs. I would do some book tours, too. Perhaps from my RV as I traveled Canada and the US. Because, as long as you aren’t the one driving, you can write while you’re on the road!

Gregory S. Close

If I achieve the sort of mega-success enjoyed by the likes of Stephen King, fame would be a small price to pay for the chance to write full time and make millions of dollars doing it. Unlike some other types of fame, authorial fame still allows for some privacy and anonymity. For example, it’s not like paparazzi are bugging King that much. Regardless, having the financial freedom to write, spend quality time with family, and travel without worrying about allotted vacation time would be worth any added scrutiny. I would also love to support a worthwhile charity in a meaningful way.

Jean Davis

If only one could be so fortunate. I suppose I would make requisite public appearances and attempt to be helpful to other writers who are not yet as popular. I’d spend the rest of my time attempting to write the next great book while under the pressure of people waiting anxiously for it and pray that it doesn’t suck as bad as I think it does.

Beth Aman

Well there’s two answers to this question. The first is that it would be AMAZING to be as popular as Stephen King, because that would mean I’d actually be able to support myself as a writer! (Isn’t that every writer’s dream?) The second is that I’m not sure I’d like being that famous. Sure, it would be amazing to meet people who had enjoyed my work, go to author signings, talk to young writers, etc… but I might go a little crazy being that popular. Hopefully I’d just use my resources to keep writing good stories and keep inspiring others, but I have no idea actually.

Paul B. Spence

Well, I suppose I’d make sure I had some say over who played in the movies… maybe have a look at the scripts, too. Really, I’m not even sure how to answer such a question. I’d quit my day job and write all the time, I suppose.

D. T. Nova

I really don’t know. Of course I’d be glad to have my writing so widely read, but I think I would be overwhelmed by too much publicity. At least at first.

Jay Dee Archer

It’s hard to say. I’ve never been the focus of more than a few hundred people, and that’s on YouTube. I’d probably enjoy the travel, going to book signings, conventions, and being able to afford my own personal travel much more. I like hotels for some reason. Speaking in front of groups used to be an issue for me, but not so much anymore. And if I sold the rights of my books to a movie studio or TV studio, I’d want to be involved in it. I wouldn’t want them to change the story very much.

But, you know, authors tend to not be in the spotlight very much. Even the big, famous authors most likely have a private life, and don’t really have a celebrity status. I’m fine with that.

How about you?

If you’re an author, how do you think you’d handle becoming famous? Let us know in the comments below.

Writing Books: Money and Fame Versus Personal Enjoyment

I’m often asked if I’m writing to make money or become famous. I’m pretty certain that will never happen. I mean the famous part. I may make some money, but I doubt it’ll be enough to make it a full-time career. So, is it for my own personal enjoyment?

I love making stories. I love to create a world I can call my own, make my own rules, and have people live the way I wish I could live. And I want to share it. I want my world to inspire people, make them want to live there, and give readers a temporary place for their minds to live in. I think that’s what a lot of people enjoy doing while they read, experiencing another way of life. And I’m enjoying doing it (if I can find the time).

But part of me wants to become successful at it. I want to be able to make enough money to do this full time. But fame? As an introvert who doesn’t particularly enjoy being the focus of attention, I’d like to skip that. But the money, sure! I mean, what author wouldn’t want to be able to make money doing what they love?

What am I really doing this for? I think the main thing is for myself. I want to enjoy telling stories. If I make money at it, that just makes it easier for me to devote more time to make more stories for people to enjoy.

What about you? If you’re an author, how would you explain the balance between money, fame, and personal enjoyment? Let me know in the comments below.

Authors Answer 44 – Changing Genre for Money or Fame

Sometimes, writing in a genre that is over-saturated with a flood of books by indie authors can make it difficult to make any money or get recognised. The book gets lost, and so does the author. But how can an author stand out? Tracey Lynn  Tobin asks a question related to this.

320px-Modern-ftn-pen-cursiveQuestion 44: Would you ever consider writing in a genre outside your scope if you thought it would give you a better chance of exposure/financial gain?

Elizabeth Rhodes

I’ve thought about it sometimes.  I mean, YA and romance seem to get a lot of attention.  But that’s not me, it’s not my style.  I can’t even fit a romantic subplot in Jasper, much less design an entire book around one.  I think if I attempted, it wouldn’t be as successful, and therefore wouldn’t earn me the attention I’d be after in the first place.

Tracey Lynn Tobin

The genres in which I feel comfortable are horror, fantasy, and supernatural, with the addendum that I feel okay writing for either adult or young adult audiences. Those are all the areas on which I feel I have a strong enough grasp to write well. They are also difficult genres in which to make a name for yourself right now because the market is so over-saturated. So yeah, I’ve definitely considered writing in other areas just to see if anything comes of it, though of course it’s not just that easy. If you know very little about a particular genre you would obviously need to do a lot of research before attempting to write in it. You’d have to learn the nuances of the genre and its audience and find beta-readers who could help you determine whether or not you’re hitting the mark. It would definitely be a lot of work, but depending on what kind of an end-game you’ve got in mind it could also be totally worth it.

On a personal note, I’ve – on multiple occasions – considered playing my hand at short romance e-books. Romance is hardly my favorite thing to write, but I feel I have the knowledge and skill to do it justice, and I’m curious to see how such a thing would sell in comparison to my zombie apocalypse novel.

Eric Wood

I have written in various genres. I write mostly for children, but for my own amusement I have attempted thrillers, mysteries, and humor. They were just short stories that I shared with a couple friends. Would I attempt to write a book in a genre other than children’s to gain exposure or financial gain? Probably not. I enjoy the genre I write in and don’t really feel confident enough to try others. My 100 word short stories aren’t for children, but 100 words is easy. A whole book? Now that’s a whole other kettle of fish.

H. Anthe Davis

I have no desire to ever write a non-fantasy/SF work for any reason.  Sure, financial gain is great, but I hate literary fiction — going through creative writing courses in college severely burned me out to anything I couldn’t throw sword-fights and dragons into.  I don’t think I’m clever enough for mysteries.  I could maybe do a full-on horror, since there’s a fair amount of horror in my SF/F already, but…  I dunno, I just don’t like the real world, so I don’t care to set anything in it.  And I have plans for fantasy/western and fantasy/romance here and there, but more as side-stories to my larger projects.  Monetary pressures don’t really work on me; if I feel I HAVE to do something, I am infinitely LESS likely to do it, because I am stubborn and spiteful, even at my own expense.

S. R. Carrillo

Sure! Anything that gives me the chance to stretch and develop my strengths as a writer, I’m up for. See, the thing about genre is that I don’t necessarily write inside of any single one of them and I’m ever so interested in so many different ones that I would welcome the challenge. If exposure and financial gain tag along for the ride, then so be it. It’s not what I’m chasing after, though.

Jean Davis

I won’t rule out “ever”, but I write what I like to write so I’m going to lean toward probably not. While I’m all for stretching myself with writing, my best stories come from the creative place where I’m comfortable writing, which is likely not the place where the big money and exposure are.

Caren Rich

Of course I would, if I thought I could do a good job. I think trying new genre’s is exciting. Staying in a given genre could lead to stagnation and boredom. As a writer, I don’t want to be limited to one type of writing. I like trying new things.

Paul B. Spence

I suppose that depends on the genre. Something besides science fiction, sure — I love thrillers and fantasy, too. I’d never write romance, though.

D. T. Nova

That depends on how far outside, how much better a chance, the size of the project, and whether I had a good idea.

For something like a novel, I doubt I could actually finish one that I didn’t really want to write.

Gregory S. Close

I hope to write in several genres, regardless of my anticipated or potential success.  Aside from fantasy, I plan to eventually publish in science fiction, literary fiction and children’s fiction, to name a few.  If I thought I had a better chance of exposure or financial gain in any one of those fields I would just do it that much faster.

Allen Tiffany

I would consider it if it was a genre in which I thought I could write well. But enjoying what I write comes first, so it would have to be a genre which would be close to what I already write and enjoy. I could not become a Romance or Horror writer, for instance. I don’t much enjoy such stories, I don’t understand how they are built, etc.

Related, I am certainly getting very attentive to how to present what I have published and will publish in ways that get them more exposure. In fact, I just wrote an article about how I’ve been fine-tuning my keywords in Amazon to increase exposure and sales of my first book, which has helped me move into the top 10 and top 15 on a couple of Amazon’s best seller lists.

Linda G. Hill

I wish I could choose a genre, but my characters tend to lead me back to the same thing over and over again. For instance, I’ve tried to write romance. Just romance. But I can’t seem to keep violence out of them. I grew up on Stephen King. That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it. But seriously, I have no idea why. I’m not a violent person. Perhaps it’s just the way I see the world. What it comes down to is what I always say: I can’t help what I write.

Jay Dee Archer

I haven’t really been interested in writing outside of science fiction and fantasy. At the moment, I’m writing science fiction, and have another science fiction title in the planning stages, but I do have a couple of fantasy ideas, too. But outside of that, I don’t think I’d want to write another genre, unless it were alternate history. However, I could see myself writing non-fiction, as well. Young adult is possible, but only if it’s fantasy or science fiction.

But for profit or recognition, I don’t think so. I’d only write it if I felt like I could do it any justice, while also enjoying it. I only want to write what I like writing. If I wrote something in a genre I felt uncomfortable writing in, I’d feel like it was a sub-par book. I only want to do my best, and that means writing where my passion lies.

How about you?

If you’re an author, could you switch genres for financial gain or more exposure? Let us know in the comments below.

Authors Answer 21 – The Ultimate Goal

We’re in it for the money, right?  Or is it to become famous?  Or do we want a bunch of fans chasing us down to our book signings?  Or nothing like that?  We all have a goal in mind for our writing.  This week’s question comes from H. Anthe Davis.

154px-Billets_de_5000Question 21: What is your ultimate goal with your writing?  Fame, fortune, changing the world?

Linda G. Hill

Again, I don’t seem to have a choice in the matter: I’m a novelist. I have a hard time writing anything between 500 and 50,000 words. Being a novelist I suppose if any of it’s going to be read, and read widely (which is what I hope) fame and fortune are the consequence. I want neither. What I would like is to be able to write, to be read, and to be financially comfortable… and have at least enough money to travel. Okay, so I guess you could say book signings all over the globe wouldn’t be a bad thing… 😀

Paul B. Spence

I was corrupt before I had power, and rich is better.

Caren Rich

To tell a good story that makes the reader cry, laugh, and think.

D. T. Nova

It would sound presumptious to speak of this on a large scale, but I do like the idea that my stories might change the world to the extent that they are read.

To me, fame would just be a means to reaching more readers.

Elizabeth Rhodes

I want to get my name out there and see what happens.  Much like the “one-day” writer mentioned in NaNoWriMo’s manifesto, I want to “have written” something.  I want to “have written” several somethings.  I don’t expect, nor do I need, to become the next J.K. Rowling, but I like the idea of it.

Tracey Lynn Tobin

Mostly, I write simply because I love it, it’s cathartic, and it excites me. It’s one of my favorite things to do, even if I’m writing something that I know no one is ever going to read.

That said, if we’re going to talk about “ultimate” goals, I would love to reach a point in my life in which I can just write…with no day job. Right now I work as an industrial instrumentation technician, traveling to and from the Alberta oil sands while working hard to pay off the last of our debts: the house. When that hurdle is crossed our day-to-day costs reduce significantly, and my husband and I aren’t the kind of people who spend a ton of money on frivolous things. Therefore, when the day comes that our house is paid off and we have a little money set aside for emergencies, I would love to take some time off to just work on my writing, build my readership, and get to the point that I can actually make a decent wage from doing what I love to do best.

So, ultimate goal? Being able to actually write as my living, without worrying that it’s going to push my family into financial ruin.

Jean Davis

Ultimate goal makes it sound so intentional. I like to put the stories in my head onto the page and share them with others. While I do like to get paid, I don’t expect to make a lot of money or create any big world changing movements. Both are welcome, but I’m caught somewhere between realistic and pessimism. If I have to claim a goal it would be to find people who enjoy my writing and keep the bad reviews to a minimum.

Amy Morris-Jones

My goals seem to change regularly. Up to recently, I’ve been writing just for myself and a few select audience members. I’ve started to send out some short stories and am starting to think seriously about publishing one of my novels. My ultimate goal is to feel comfortable calling myself a writer… but I’m yet to decide precisely what that looks like!

S. R. Carrillo

I would like to say I wanna change the world, but I’m far too frightened to do such a thing. I just wanna entertain. I wanna read the books I don’t get to read by reading other writers’ works. I wanna change my world. Keep it dirty and nummy and twisted. And, honestly, I wanna keep my sanity. Have you ever tried to keep a true writer from writing? It’s torture…

H. Anthe Davis

Frankly, the thing I want most in the world is fanfiction.  Even if it’s bad.  I want someone else to love my characters enough that they want to throw them into ridiculous, dramatic, romantic or alternate-universe situations just so they can have fun writing them.  I have fun writing them; why wouldn’t I want that for others?  And I would read the fanfiction and laugh maniacally and then go sink some ‘ships.

Jay Dee Archer

I have two answers to this.  My dream answer and my realistic answer.

I dream to sell a lot of books.  Not to become famous, not to get rich, but to have my stories read.  I want to have people enjoy what I read.  Of course, I’d like to make enough money to live on writing alone, and have extra for things like travel.

My realistic answer is very similar, to be honest.  I just want to entertain people and hopefully make some money to supplement my main job income.  I don’t plan on this replacing my job entirely.  It’s rare for any author to be able to write full time.

But I guess my real ultimate goal is to write full time.  Why?  Because I enjoy it.

How about you?

If you write, or you want to write, what is your ultimate goal?  Leave your answers in the comments below.