Tag Archives: gender equality

My Daughter Can Do Anything

I have a four-year-old daughter. She likes pink and purple. She loves wearing skirts. She loves dolls, My Little Pony, Frozen, Pretty Cure, and drawing hearts and flowers. She also loves cars, trains, and airplanes. She has shown interest in ballet and singing. She’s also shown interest in soccer and baseball. She is full of energy, strong-willed, stubborn, and takes control over whatever group she’s playing with.

She has shown a very strong ability to problem solve, work with her hands, do puzzles that are meant for older kids, and create things with Lego. She has an incredible imagination, as I would expect kids to have. Within a few months, she should be fully bilingual in Japanese and English. She loves numbers. She loves animals.

She’s told me she wants to be a ballerina, singer, and a doctor.

She can do it. She can be whatever she wants. She can do anything she wants. If she wants to join a baseball team, then I’ll be there cheering for her. If she becomes the top kid in her school in math, I will be very happy for her. If she wants to become a singer and go on a show like Canada’s Got Talent, then I’ll be behind her all the way.

I will not tolerate people who tell her she can’t do something because she’s a girl. If she has a teacher who ignores her ability to do math, tells her that girls can’t do math, I won’t hesitate to tell the teacher that I will be reporting them to the Principal and school board for their sexism. If she’s a great pitcher, and her baseball coach has her sitting on the bench because she’s a girl and girls can’t throw, I will not tolerate that. I want her to be recognised for her ability, not her gender. If she’s bad at something, then she can practice more. She needs to earn her place. But if she’s ever told she can’t do something because she’s a girl, I will not be a pleasant person to deal with.

She will do what she wants to do. I will support her dreams. I won’t let her settle with what society expects of her. She needs to do what she desires. It’s her life to live, not anyone else’s. I’m happy to live in a society that supports this. But there’s still a long way to go.

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