Tag Archives: plants

No Man’s Sky and Worldbuilding – Part 2

I already talked a bit about No Man’s Sky and worldbuilding in a previous blog post, but I decided to talk about it on video, as well. However, I go into far more detail in the video. You can watch it right here.

I mentioned that I’ll be putting up images from the game here on this blog. Consider it inspiration for worldbuilding. There are some fantastic landscapes and very interesting animals to see. Expect some posts about that soon!

Let me know what you thought of the video in the comments below. It really has me thinking a lot about what to do with developing the landscapes, animals, and plants of Ariadne.

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Choose My Best Instagram Photos – Round 1, Group 44

First of all, if you haven’t voted in the last group, please do so. It needs more votes. I’d appreciate it!

There’s a lot of green in this group, and one of my favourite pictures. I wonder if you know which one it is. I thought it looked great after I took it. Let me know which picture you think I like the most.

The rules are simple. I post 10 of my Instagram photos every few days, and you get to vote on your favourites. It’s multiple choice, so please vote for 2 to 4 photos (3 is ideal). Leave a comment saying why you voted the way you did. The poll comes after the photos.

Here are the photos:

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Jujo station from Saikyo Line train

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Street in Warabi

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Rainbow after the rain

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Four leaf clover

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Big green poplar

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Beautiful spring view with Mt. Fuji

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Venus above the wires

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Izumino Station during a thunderstorm

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Spring sunset

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Ofuna festival starts!

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And now the vote. Please vote for your favourite photos (ideally 3, but anywhere between 2 and 4):

 

Thank you for the votes! Let me know which pictures you voted for in the comments below. I’d love to know what you think.

TV Impression – Walking With Monsters

Walking_with_Monsters_DVD_coverWalking With Monsters

Series length: 3 episodes

Genre: Documentary

This is the first of a series of TV impressions. They are not full reviews. Usually, I will do a full series impression. However, in some circumstances, I will do episode-by-episode impressions. In this case, I will be doing a series impression. So, let’s get to it!

This series was created by the BBC and shows what life was like during the Palaeozoic, the time before the dinosaurs. Coming out in 2005, the computer animation is quite good, though still looks a bit artificial. I found it to be very interesting, as we usually don’t get to see much about this time in prehistory, other than hearing about dimetrodons. It’s usually overshadowed by the Mesozoic and the dinosaurs.

The things I found fascinating about this include the environment and development of life. It had me thinking a lot about worldbuilding, in fact. The oxygen levels in the atmosphere varied vastly during this time, as did the arrangements of the continents. This resulted in totally different ecosystems developing. At one time, it’s extremely hot and humid, at others it’s very cold, and another time, it’s hot and dry. How do the animals adapt? Watching this gave me a little more insight into how to create a world with alien animals.

I recommend this series for those of you who love natural history. I’d give it 4 out of 5 stars.

City Workers Don’t Know How to Cut Grass

In Japan, grass isn’t a very common thing in yards. There are parks with grass, but most of them are covered in dirt and concrete with flower beds. Any grass tends to either be left to grow very tall or cut down too short.

Take this picture, for example.

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This is next to the park near our home. It was once covered with grass, but now seems to be bare soil. The city workers cut the grass so short that they were cutting into the soil. It’s as if they were intending to kill the grass. But you can see the effects easily. Clumps of soil have fallen out and the slope is beginning to collapse. At the top is a playground. If they destabilise the ground even more, a heavy rain storm could cause a minor landslide. All because they cut the grass so much that it’s nearly all gone. Don’t they know anything about the stabilising effects of grass roots?

Unfortunately, I see this all over the place. These workers are not landscapers or gardeners, that’s for sure. They have no clue what to do with grass.

Plants on alien worlds

Do you ever wonder what plants on alien worlds would look like? The answer may be in the type of star it orbits.

Red dwarf stars give off little light and heat, so plants would need to absorb as much light as possible, according to a preview of an article I read online. It makes sense that they would appear black.

F type stars are quite bright and would likely need to reflect a lot of light. Shiny leaves? But what colour would they be? Apparently, green, yellow or red. Maybe anything in between, too.

This makes it interesting for creating new worlds for science fiction. Knowing the spectral type if the star gives you an idea about what colour the plants may be. Going beyond that, it may give an idea about what wavelengths animals can see.

In my planned sci-fi novel, the star I chose is a bit younger than the sun, but a G type star. The plants are likely to be green.

But I’d love to see planets with plants of many other colours.