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Book Review – Gunship

Gunship is the debut book by John M. Davis, and the first in a series of books.  It’s available in Kindle format, though it appears there was a paperback edition.  It was independently published, so this is the third indie book I’ve reviewed.

I found this to be a very quick read.  It’s not a long book, and is easy to finish quickly.  It involves the crew of a gunship, a crew of outlaws wanted by many people, but they’re well-meaning.  Captain Adam Michaels is the lead character, and he is a brash leader prone to impulsive decisions that aren’t always the best choice.  Then there’s Dalton, his best friend and alcoholic, providing plenty of humour.  Roman is a tough fighter with another side to his personality. Kelly, Kato, and Luck round out the crew, though those three have very little development.  Sarah and Troy come in soon and complete the group.  Of all the characters, I found Michaels and Roman to have the best development, while Dalton remained pretty static.  Sarah seemed soft, but has a tough side to her.  Kelly, Kato, Luck, and Troy don’t get much time to develop.  The dynamic between Michaels and Dalton is humourous.  The romance wasn’t very well done early on, unfortunately.  I found it unnatural and a bit cheesy in the beginning.

The story takes place both in space, as well as a handful of planets.  There wasn’t much in the way of extensive description, it was kept pretty short, but was effective enough to create a solid picture in my mind.  Although it’s in space, I found it interesting that most weapons were rather old-fashioned.  I guess it’s retro sci-fi in a way.  The antagonists were kind of like vampires, making it an odd combination with science fiction.

The story itself is mainly action scene after action scene.  There is a small amount of downtime in between, but not very much.  It’s a very fast paced story, so there’s plenty of excitement.  Davis describes the action reasonably well.  It’s not a complex story, and is very straightforward.  It’s not entirely predictable, but it doesn’t really give much in the way of surprises.   But it is an entertaining story.

I don’t base my reviews on editing issues, but I have to mention that this book really needs an editor to clean up the strange dialogue punctuation, spelling mistakes, and lack of line breaks between characters’ speech.  It’s also difficult to tell when a scene change happens, as they’re not marked.

Aside from the editing problems, I found this book to be fairly entertaining, though not very deep.  It’s a simple story with pretty basic characters.  But I did enjoy the story.

I’d give it 3 stars. It’s an entertaining read, and I’m curious about where the story will go in the next book.

Book Review – Revelation Space

Revelation Space, the first in Alastair Reynolds’ science fiction series Revelation Space held some big surprises for me.  Reynolds was an astrophysicist who worked for the European Space Agency until he became a full time author.  This book is a hard SF novel with plenty of interesting future technology.

I went into this book not knowing what to expect.  Although I read the blurb on the cover, it doesn’t really tell much of the story.  This story takes place mostly on the planet Resurgam, but also in space and another planet, Yellowstone. The settings are quite dark and gritty.  It seems much of the technology is very advanced, but there are problems.  Everything is described quite well, although Reynolds uses a lot of very technical terminology.  He was a scientist, after all.

I found it difficult to get into this book in the beginning.  For the first half, I didn’t really care about any of the characters.  They all seemed so self-centred and not very likeable.  However, many of the main characters began to grow on me, and I liked them by the end.  Dan Sylveste is a very interesting character who is single-minded in his quest.  Ana Khouri is probably my favourite character of the book.  She’s a strong character, but still has many doubts.  Ilia Volyova seems like such an unlikeable person, but I grew to really like her by the end.  Pascale is a decent character, too.  Sajaki is probably one of the more unusual characters, being a chimeric with a desire for power.  Hegazi wasn’t developed very well, and I just couldn’t figure out what to make of him.  But I particularly enjoyed Calvin Sylveste, who was a very colourful character.  However, I could never be sure who was bad.  It kept me guessing.

As I said, I didn’t get into the book in the beginning, though around the halfway point, I was looking forward to opening the book and reading.  It’s quite scientific, and some things were explained somewhat like a textbook.  There was a lot of secrecy between the characters, and it made some of the story unpredictable, as I couldn’t tell what some of them were thinking.  Towards the end, it was fantastic.  I felt like I couldn’t put down the book.  I certainly couldn’t predict the ending.  I’m interested in what will happen next.

I’ll give this 4 1/2 stars.  The ending was amazing, but I found it hard to get into in the beginning.  Some of the terminology may be difficult for some, but with my background in astronomy and physics, it wasn’t a problem for me.  I found it fascinating.  Highly recommended.

Book Review – Voidhawk

Voidhawk by Jason Halstead is the first novel I read with my Kindle app on my iPhone.  I’m not used to reading eBooks, but I found that there were some formatting problems.  That may be the fault of the app or it may not have been edited or formatted properly.  However, this will not affect my review.

This was both a very interesting book and a very unusual book.  It was interesting because of the setting.  It’s quite unique.  Halstead created a universe in which traditional fantasy races traveled in wooden boats in the Void.  The Void is their word for space.  So, this was fantasy in space!  It is in no way science fiction.  The only thing that separates it from the usual earthbound fantasy is the fact that it is in space.  I really enjoyed how he set it up with planets being the unusual locations for people to go, while most were in the Void in vast artificial settlements and on asteroids.  These places had their own atmospheres.  In fact, every ship had its own atmosphere and gravity plane.

What I found unusual is how its very episodic.  It doesn’t seem to have a single storyline, unless you count the central romance or the characters’ increasing familiarity with each other.  There are many smaller adventures, mostly in life or death situations.  But that doesn’t mean it’s a serious book.  I found it filled with humour.  Some of it was a bit childish and unnatural.  I couldn’t put my finger on it until later in the book when I realised that the humour was quite similar to that of Japanese animation.  Male characters tend to be very embarrassed by female nudity.  While they seem to be adults, they behave like awkward teenagers who have never seen a nude woman.  And yes, there is plenty of nudity and adult humour in this book. It’s not for kids.

The characters were an interesting bunch.  Dexter Silvercloud is the Captain. He’s daring, impulsive, occasionally responsible, and seems to have the most internal conflict.  Kragor is the dwarf first mate who never seems to be serious. A lot of humour comes from him.  He’s a decent character that I liked.  Jenna is the elf. At first, headstrong and stubborn, but she shows the greatest development.  Bekka is the half-elven pilot, and I didn’t find her character to be very deep.  Other characters come in to join the crew, such as Jodyne, Rosh, Bailynn, Keshira, Xander, Willa, and Logan.  My main difficulty with the characters is how they changed emotions suddenly and irrationally.  They didn’t seem very natural.  I don’t know if Halstead noticed this, but every character “chuckled” all the time. That word was overused.

I believe this is his debut book, so his style probably hadn’t been firmly established yet.  But despite the problems I saw, it was a fun read.  It has good entertainment value, but don’t expect to find a deep story.  I’m looking forward to reading the second book in this series, though.

I will give this 3 stars.  It’s not amazing, but it is a decent first book. Recommended to those who enjoy some humour mixed in with their fantasy. Also recommended to those who like unique settings.

Book Review – Gardens of the Moon

Gardens of the Moon by Steven Erikson is the first book of the epic fantasy The Malazan Book of the Fallen. It’s a lengthy series, so it’s quite an undertaking to read all of it.  And I’ve only just started.

This book was a difficult one to rate.  It’s Steven Erikson’s debut novel, and I could see some flaws early on.  However, my attitude toward the book changed dramatically as I continued to read it.

Gardens of the Moon takes place mostly on the continent of Genabackis amidst a campaign of expansion and domination by the Malazan Empire.  The world was developed for a GURPS campaign by Erikson and his friend Ian Cameron Esslemont, and Malazan Book of the Fallen is a novelization of that world.  The world is completely original.  Unlike other fantasy novels, the cultures and races are unique to this series.  There are no elves, dwarves, ogres, and so on.  Instead, you get the Tiste Andii, T’lan Imass, Jaghut, and more.  Humans are the main race, however.  Wizards and gods take a major role, as well, but they’re not exactly what we would normally expect. Overall, the world is incredibly imaginative.

The ensemble cast of characters is vast.  Ganoes Paran is kind of the hero, though he doesn’t seem to be very heroic.  He’s a soldier thrown into a situation he wishes he wasn’t in.  Tattersail is a powerful mage with many insecurities.  Lorn, the Empress’ Adjunct is also an incredibly flawed character.  Sergeant Whiskeyjack, Kalam, Quick Ben, Crokus, Rallick, Kruppe, and more make some very colourful characters who aren’t always what they seem to be.  That’s one thing that made this book so interesting to read, the reader doesn’t know what to expect from the characters.  They are very well developed through the book, and we never quite know who are really the good guys and who are the bad guys.  With few exceptions, the line between good and bad is blurred very much.  While the characters are strong, it was very confusing for the first quarter of the book.  There were so many characters that I had a hard time keeping everyone straight.

The story has two sides to it.  In the beginning, I found it difficult to follow.  I had no idea what was going on.  But as the plot moved along, things became clearer, and I could understand what was happening.  Basically, it’s a large empire trying to conquer the biggest city on the continent of Genabackis.  But it’s not that simple.  There are many individuals who change their positions, the “good” seem to ally themselves with the “bad,” and so on.  It was incredibly unpredictable.  That should be expected, since this was based on a GURPS role playing campaign.  That’s what made much of this book so amazing to read.  You never knew what was going to happen.  Main characters die, sometimes unexpectedly.  We never know more than the characters know.  It’s like we’re going along with the ride, joining in the action.  It makes it much more exciting.

Like I said before, this was a difficult book to read.  For the first quarter of the book, I wasn’t impressed.  It was maybe going to get three or three and a half stars at that point.  But the rest of the book was a solid four and a half to five stars.  So, what do I rate it?

Four and a half stars.  Recommended to any fantasy fan, especially those who want something new and refreshing.

Book Review – Ender’s Game

Ender’s Game” by Orson Scott Card is the first of several novels that follow the life of Andrew “Ender” Wiggin. The war with the Buggers has been going on for decades, and while Earth had defeated their massive fleets in the past, Earth needs a commander who can lead them to victory once and for all.  They do this by selecting genetically engineered children for battle school, and they have to endure intense training to become the best soldiers possible.  This book follows Ender’s training.

The above premise is quite simple, but there are facets to this story that were somewhat unexpected, making it much deeper than I’d thought.  It’s a very quick read, and at the pace I read books, this was the fastest book I’d read all year.  It is very easy to read, as it is very direct and to the point, with brief descriptions and quick action.  It’s not particularly detailed in the narrative, but the dialogue drives much of this book.  We hear Ender’s thoughts and everything he says.  Although it spans several years, the book is only 324 pages.

There are several central characters, including Ender, his older brother Peter, older sister Valentine, the head of the battle school Colonel Graff, and several other students of the battle school, particularly Alai, Bean, Petra, Bonzo, and Bernard.  Ender starts off as a 6 year old boy, and his character is compassionate, intelligent, and sometimes lacking in confidence.  He’s a mix of Peter’s aggression and Valentine’s pacifism.  Although much of the story involves Ender and the people at battle school, Peter and Valentine do play an important part in this story back on Earth.  I particularly like the characters of Alai and Petra, as they have a lot of integrity and are good kids.  Sometimes Ender’s attitude bothered me, so I couldn’t completely empathise with him.  Although I was rooting for him, he often seemed to do some things too perfectly.  Colonel Graff was an infuriating character.  He was supportive, yet too harsh.

The story took place almost exclusively on the battle school space station, though occasionally back on Earth.  The setting wasn’t described in detail, but I could imagine it well enough.

The plot seemed straightforward in the beginning.  For much of the book, I could read without many surprises.  However, it was quite interesting.  The battle tactics were very detailed and the psychology of living in a space station and using zero gravity were quite good.  I enjoyed reading when they were getting used to the battle room’s zero gravity.  Later in the story, things started becoming more intense and the motivations were more mysterious.  It had me guessing what was going to happen.  By the end, I was very surprised.  It was a very good ending that provides many possibilities for further books, which of course there were several.

I had a hard time thinking about how to rate this book.  I wasn’t feeling the story as much as I would have liked.  I couldn’t identify with the characters as much as I wanted.  It was almost excellent.  However, it was very, very good and an easy book to read.

4.5/5 stars.  It’s too good for a 4, but didn’t impress me enough for a 5.  But it’s very highly recommended.

Book Review – A Game of Thrones

A Game of ThronesA Game of Thrones” is a medieval fantasy book that has the world talking lately.  It’s the first in the “A Song of Fire and Ice” series by George R. R. Martin, and has recently been adapted for TV.  As I always read the book before I see the movie or TV series, now was a good time to get this started.

The version I’m reviewing appears to be a special alternate cover, and while it is paperback, it’s the size of a hardcover book.  Not so easy to carry around, and it seemed that the pages took much longer to read than a normal book.  But anyway, that’s just the version I’d bought.

When you think of fantasy novels, you usually think of a naive, inexperienced farm boy going on a heroic quest for self discovery and to defeat evil.  Well, there’s none of that here.  Dragons and magic are a part of this story, but they’re quite minor in this book.  What’s important here is politics.  There’s plenty of it!  The main characters are all high society, lords, ladies, kings, queens, and highly respected knights.  No one is entirely good and no one is entirely bad.  Everyone is in a grey area.  In other words, they are human.  There are a lot of characters to hate, as there’s a lot of despicable behaviour, and some of them you just want dead.  There are characters you root for, but they have flaws, just like regular people.

The book is told from a third person point of view, centered on many of the main characters.  Each chapter has a different point of view character, and the narration is told in such a way that you can feel their personalities in the words.  I felt like I could get to know the characters better that way.  In some ways, I could sympathise with most of them, but others I just didn’t like as people.  But the characters that are supposed to be the bad guys have a certain amount of good in them.  The focus is mostly on the Stark family, including Lord Eddard Stark, his wife Catelyn, and children Bran, Sansa, Arya, and Jon.  The main antagonists are the Lannister family, though we only follow the imp, Tyrion.  We get to view the actions of the other Lannisters through the eyes of Tyrion and the Starks.  There’s one other main character, Daenerys, the daughter of the previous King.  I can’t say whether she’s a protagonist or antagonist in this series, though.  It’s not completely apparent.  Through these people, we get to see what their world and circumstances are like.

Fantasy usually has a central hero.  This does not.  It’s an ensemble cast, and none of them is a hero.  The story doesn’t show heroic deeds, but it does show incredible tragedy, and a lot of it.  For those of you who like tragic stories, this is a great one for you.  But there are some major victories to be had.  There is a lot of death, rape, injustice, and treachery.  It’s dark.  The deaths are often gruesome.  There’s also sex, but it’s not graphically described. It’s depicted as just a fact of life.  And it seems like death must always be accepted, since it seems to touch everyone’s lives.

I came into this book knowing that it’s popular, and that many people thoroughly enjoyed it.  So, my expectations were set quite high.  I wasn’t sure whether to expect a typical heroic fantasy or something completely different.  The story was not predictable.  I was surprised often, which is a very good thing.  I wanted to read more and more with what little time I had.  I was more than satisfied.  This book has made a new fan.  It was quite excellent, and I would recommend it to anyone who loves this kind of story.  It exceeded my expectations.

5/5 stars.  Outstanding.

Book Review: Endymion

The third book in the Hyperion Cantos series by Dan Simmons is “Endymion.”  While “The Fall of Hyperion” immediately follows “Hyperion,” “Endymion” takes place more than 250 years after the the second book.  So far, all three books have been very different.  This installment follows Raul Endymion of Hyperion, the future messiah Aenea, and the android Bettik as they go on an epic journey over many planets.  Of course, the Shrike makes an appearance.

What’s interesting is how this book is told from the point of view of three characters, Raul Endymion, Father Captain Federico de Soya, and the mysterious Nemes.  Most of it is from the point of view of the former two characters.  At times, it’s difficult to tell the order of events at the beginning of the chapters, as it’s not done in real time chronological order.  But the time frame is evident as the chapter unfolds.

As with the first two books, religion plays a major part in the story, though it mostly shows how corrupt religion can become.  In a way, “Endymion” is providing us with a 31st century version of the Crusades.

The characters are quite engaging.  The chapters involving Raul are told from a first person point of view, while the other chapters are third person point of view.  The entire book is written by Raul as a record of what happened.  He is a very resourceful and intelligent person who got on the wrong side of the law.  However, he has to be the hero.  Aenea is a highly intelligent and extremely mature for her age girl of only 11 years old.  I can’t imagine any real 11 year old kids speaking like her and with the knowledge she has, but she is a very unusual character, being the daughter of Brawne Lamia.  A. Bettik is a character readers of the first two books should be familiar with.  He is a brave and noble character and fairly likeable.  Father Captain de Soya is a military officer and a priest who is utterly devoted to the Catholic church, and is a man of strong morals who is single-minded in his pursuit of our protagonists.  Even though he is the main antagonist, I liked his character.  He’s not really a bad guy.  Far from it.  He’s just doing his job.  There’s a large number of other characters to complement these four, and many are very interesting, although some I found contemptible with greed and poor morals.

The story itself reads like an epic fantasy novel.  While this is pure science fiction, the adventurous style of this book would appeal to readers of epic fantasy, as they travel from world to world in strange new environments.  I could imagine each planet very clearly and vividly with Simmons’ descriptions.  He isn’t overly descriptive, so the story moves at a decent pace.  There is a lot of action and many tense moments that meant life or death.  Often, I can tell where a story is going, but in this case, I had no idea.  It had me constantly guessing what was going to happen next.  It was quite unpredictable with plenty of surprises.  I was very interested in what was going to happen next.  That makes it a very good story.

I wasn’t sure what to expect going into this book after the previous two, but I’m very happy to say that I’m satisfied.  I give this a very well earned 4 out of 5 stars.

Book Review – The Eye of the World

The Eye of the World” is the first book in Robert Jordan’s fantasy epic “The Wheel of Time.”  It’s sometimes considered a modern take on Tolkien’s world, although I haven’t seen any dwarves or elves.  I can see some parallels plot-wise, but I’d like to consider this book on its own merits.  I don’t like comparing to other books.

This series came highly recommended to me by a friend who loves “The Wheel of Time.”  I’d already had most of the series, though I hadn’t read any of it. Well, I finally started it, and I’d have to say my initial reaction wasn’t very favourable.  I’ll get to that in a moment.

The story starts out with a prologue, which sets a bit of a background for the events that will happen in the book.  It then moved forward to our main story, featuring a trio of sheepherders, tall and strong Rand, prankster Mat, and stocky Perrin.  These three, as well as a few other characters meet a mysterious woman and man, and are swept into a long journey of self-discovery and a quest to save the world from an evil being.  Sounds like a pretty typical fantasy epic storyline.  It is a pretty standard story, but from what I’ve heard, the books after this are quite different.

It’s said in this book that time repeats itself.  Ages come and go in a forward progression of time, but the events that happen are repeated many times, though by different people who are actually incarnations of people in previous ages.  It’s an interesting concept, so I wasn’t exactly sure if each book would just repeat the same kind of story or not.  As far as I know, that’s not the case.  It’s a very, very long epic story involving the same characters.  I’m interested to see how it progresses.

As I said before, my initial reaction wasn’t very favourable.  The story progressed very slowly, and I found it somewhat difficult to get into it.  The characters weren’t very engaging, and I just couldn’t get attached to any of them.  I felt no sympathy for them.  But they did grow on me over time.  This is the kind of story that you just have to stick with to the end to be satisfied.  In the last quarter of the book, relationships between characters were moving in interesting ways, and questions were finally being answered.  There were a lot of mysteries presented earlier on in the book, and I was looking forward to seeing them resolved.  However, by the end of the book, several mysteries were still unresolved.  It ended with the main story concluded, but it also opened the way for a much bigger story to be told.  It looks like it’ll be a very large epic story to come.

I felt like this book was a mediocre story most of the way, and I was thinking I’d have to give it a middle of the road 3 stars.  But the final quarter of the book redeemed it.  I’ll give it 4 out of 5 stars.  It’s good if you’re patient, and I do recommend that you finish reading it.

Book Review – The Grand Tour: A Traveler’s Guide to the Solar System

As many people know, I have a degree in physics and astronomy, so I love to read about space and the planets.  When I found “The Grand Tour: A Traveler’s Guide to the Solar System” in a bookstore here in Japan, I knew I had to buy it.  This is the third edition, published in 2005.  It was written by and contains artwork by artist and author Ron Miller and artist, author and astronomer William K. Hartmann.

This book is set up to take you on a tour of the solar system as if you are a first time visitor.  It starts out with an overview of the solar system and describes how the book is laid out.  Then it describes how the solar system came to be.  It is a bit scientific here, but reasonably easy to read.

The meat of the book comes next.  Instead of going through the planets in order, it starts off with the largest bodies in the solar system.  Beginning with Jupiter, we get to learn about each body, from the structures to the atmospheres.  It moves on to Saturn, then Uranus, Neptune, and finally the Earth.  After the Earth, it continues with Venus, Mars and then Ganymede.  Ganymede?  Yes, Jupiter’s largest moon is larger than the planet Mercury.  But Mercury isn’t next, it’s Titan.  Then it’s finally Mercury.  So basically, it continues on looking at the planets, satellites, dwarf planets, a few major asteroids, Kuiper Belt objects and comets.  Each is accompanied by the latest photographs and beautiful artwork.  It even contains photographs from Cassini and Huygens from Saturn and Titan, as well as the Spirit and Opportunity rovers on Mars.  It doesn’t include any photos from MESSENGER at Mercury, Phoenix at Mars, or Dawn at Vesta.  Those missions occurred after this book was published.

The book concludes with a section on Exoplanets and a glossary of terms.  I really enjoyed reading this book and seeing the artwork.  It’s a must for anyone who loves astronomy and planetary exploration.  I look forward to the fourth edition, if there is one, with pictures from Vesta, Ceres, Pluto, Mercury, and more!

I’ll give this a well deserved 5 out of 5 stars.  Highly recommended!

Book Review – 2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake

2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake

Author: Various

Genre: Nonfiction History, Essays

Published 2011

Review copy: Free eBook from Amazon

Overall Rating: 4 out of 5

Goodreads Description

In just over a week, a group of unpaid professional and citizen journalists who met on Twitter created a book to raise money for Japanese Red Cross earthquake and tsunami relief efforts. In addition to essays, artwork and photographs submitted by people around the world, including people who endured the disaster and journalists who covered it, 2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake contains a piece by Yoko Ono, and work created specifically for the book by authors William Gibson, Barry Eisler and Jake Adelstein.

“The primary goal,” says the book’s editor, a British resident of Japan, “is to record the moment, and in doing so raise money for the Japanese Red Cross Society to help the thousands of homeless, hungry and cold survivors of the earthquake and tsunami. The biggest frustration for many of us was being unable to help these victims. I don’t have any medical skills, and I’m not a helicopter pilot, but I can edit. A few tweets pulled together nearly everything – all the participants, all the expertise – and in just over a week we had created a book including stories from an 80-year-old grandfather in Sendai, a couple in Canada waiting to hear if their relatives were okay, and a Japanese family who left their home, telling their young son they might never be able to return.”

If you’d like to make a donation to aid the victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, please visit the Japanese Red Cross Society website, where you can donate via Paypal or bank transfer (watch out for the fees, though!) or the American Red Cross Society, which accepts donations directed to its Japan Earthquake and Pacific Tsunami fund (but only accepts donations made with U.S.-issued credit cards).

And of course, if you like the book, please tell your friends, and tell them to give generously as well! Thank you! Japan really does appreciate your help!

Review

2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake is kind of special to me.  On March 11, 2011, I went through what many of the people who contributed to this book went through.  I live in Japan, and on that day, so many things changed when the magnitude 9.0 megathrust earthquake hit the Tohoku region of Japan, off the coast of Miyagi Prefecture.  The devastating tsunami came along afterwards, and then a nuclear meltdown at a nuclear power plant in Fukushima made things even worse.  What I read in this book is very similar to my own experiences, and it brought back many memories.

The editor of 2:46, Our Man In Abiko, put together a collection of personal accounts by many social media users and bloggers, as well as some famous people, in just over a week.  That is quite the feat.  This book was created to raise money for charity to help relieve the situation in the disaster-stricken Tohoku region.  Some contributors include William Gibson, Yoko Ono, Baye McNeil, Jake Adelstein, and many others.  I had an opportunity to participate, but didn’t really think about it at that moment.

So, how is the book?  Don’t expect it to be well written by every contributor.  These are average people who are amateur writers at best, though there are a few professionals who write extremely well.  The experiences are wide and varied, from people living near the disaster area to those who are living overseas.  But they all have a connection to Japan, most having lived there.  Some contributions conveyed emotions quite well.  I found that I could relate to most of the pieces, and could clearly picture what was going on.  I could feel the motion of the earthquake as I read it.  I could see how people reacted in my mind.  I lived it all over again several times through this book.

Don’t expect amazing narrative or prose when reading this, but please read it to see what it was like to experience a 9.0 magnitude megathrust earthquake and the resulting tsunami and nuclear disaster. Highly recommended!

4 out of 5 stars.