Tag Archives: A to Z Challenge

Week in Review – April 30, 2017

Week in review? More like four weeks in review. What a month it’s been. I didn’t expect to catch a very strong cold that sapped my energy, then have to work for 10 straight days, most of which was very physical. That’s done for a while now, though. So, here’s what’s happened!

Reading

I got up to 79% in Theft of Swords by Michael J. Sullivan. I didn’t read nearly as much as I should have. I was tired. A lot.

Writing

Very tired. I couldn’t do any.

Videos

I didn’t have time or the energy to do much in the way of videos. I made no videos for my main channel. However, there were 5 new videos on my science channel. I was going to do the A to Z Challenge, but that obviously got interrupted.

Patreon

Nothing yet, but with the way the past month went, I didn’t expect anything.

Languages

I studied a little French, but not much.

The Blog

I’m very interested in seeing the stats for the Month in Review post coming soon. Lots of comments and views on a couple of my more controversial posts, one about Justin Trudeau, and one about the Mt. Etna meme that likes about the amount of CO2 the volcano releases in relation to the world’s CO2 production. I’ve been insulted. I have yet to respond.

Also, the A to Z Challenge was interrupted, as I mentioned before.

Studying

Nothing.

The Next Week’s Goals

Make sure my science blog is updated. Also, get to work on a lot of videos, catch up on comments, and actually work toward completing the A to Z Challenge. I should mention that we’re going to Japan in a month, so I need to work on getting my daughter’s passport done, but we need a document for that. Just waiting for it now.

How was your week?

Everything Derailed! The Jay Dee Show 27

Things were going so well. The A to Z Challenge had begun, I was getting videos out on time, and then it happened. Derailment. I caught a cold so strong that I had very little energy. And just as I’d recovered, I started working 10 straight days on something that was physically demanding. Again, energy sapped. But I should be getting things back on track now!

First of all, my main channel has had no new videos. I have a couple coming up, though. Already recorded!

Moving on to my science channel, there are 3 videos to report to you!

First is the letter B. It’s 10 Facts about Bees!

Moving on the letter C, it’s 10 Facts about the Canada Goose.

And then for the letter D, it’s 10 Fact about DNA.

They’re all about biology, surprisingly. I already have the E video ready to edit and upload, which I’ll do tomorrow.

What do we have in store for the next week? Videos! I plan on continuing the A to Z Challenge, even though it’s finishing. I’m not quitting. For my main channel, it looks like I may have a tag video to do, as well as some vlogs. I’ll be working on the regular weekly videos, and maybe more! I should get back to doing Japan videos, too.

So, which video did you enjoy the most?

D Is for DNA

This post is coming a day late. I hope that’s not a problem with the rules of the A to Z Challenge! You see, I have some foreign DNA in my body. The common cold. I was too tired to get the video and post up last night. But here it is now! For the letter D, I’m talking about DNA. How many of these facts did you know?

And here are the facts:

  1. DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid.
  2. A DNA molecule is made up of two bipolymer strands wrapped around each other to form a double helix.
  3. There are four nucleobases represented by the letters C, G, A, and T. They are cytosine, guanine, adenine, and thymine.
  4. Nucleobases pair up, A with T and C with G to connect the two DNA strands to form the double helix.
  5. Only 2% of human DNA codes protein sequences. The remaining 98% have other various functions, which would require another full video to talk about.
  6. The species with the largest number of chromosomes is the ciliated protozoa with 29,640,000.
  7. The species with the fewest number of chromosomes is the jack jumper ant with only 2. But that’s for the females. Males are haploid and have only 1, the smallest number possible.
  8. Humans have 46 chromosomes, but other great apes, including chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans, have 48.
  9. More than 8% of the human genome is made up of retrovirus sequences.
  10. There is a 4% difference in the genomes of humans and our closest relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos.

Let me know in the comments section below what you knew.

E Is for Europa

Even though the A to Z Challenge is over, and I took a huge break, I’m going to finish it. A lot has happened over the last couple months, but it’s back! Today is the letter E, and I’m talking about Jupiter’s moon Europa! Did you learn anything new?

  1. Europa is the fourth largest natural satellite of Jupiter.
  2. It was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei, along with the other three Galilean satellites.
  3. The surface of Europa is the smoothest surface of any world in the Solar System, consisting of water ice.
  4. Europa orbits Jupiter in just 3.55 days, with one side always facing Jupiter, as it’s tidally locked.
  5. Beneath the ice crust is an estimated 100 km deep ocean of salt water. But it isn’t clear if the ice is thick or thin. However, the amount of water on Europa is about two to three times the volume of Earth’s oceans.
  6. Europa has a weak magnetic field, best explained by Europa’s salt water ocean.
  7. Tidal heating from the interactions of Europa with Jupiter and the other Galilean satellites warms the interior of the moon, possibly resulting in hydrothermal vents at the floor of the ocean. This has led scientists to suggest that life may exist in Europa’s ocean.
  8. Europa most likely has an iron core and a rocky mantle.
  9. Observations by the Hubble Space Telescope provide further evidence of subsurface oceans, as plumes of water have been seen erupting to 200 km above the surface.
  10. Europa has an oxygen atmosphere. But it’s very thin, providing a surface pressure of only 0.1 micropascals.

Let me know what you learned in the comments section below!

C Is for Canada Goose

What other bird says “Canada” to you? Maybe the loon? Well, how about the Canada goose? For the letter C, I am talking about the Canada goose! Check out the video, which includes some bonus video of a v-formation I managed to catch.

And here are the facts. How many did you know?

  1. This large goose is native to the arctic and temperature regions of North America.
  2. It’s been introduced to other parts of the world, including the UK, New Zealand, Argentina, and Chile.
  3. They are extremely successful at adapting to human habitation, so they are a very common bird around cities and towns, now having a population of between 4 and 5 million.
  4. There are 7 subspecies of Canada goose.
  5. They range from 75 to 120 cm in length and have a wingspan of between 127 and 185 cm.
  6. In most bird species, sexual dimorphism is apparent in the differences between male and female bird appearance, but the male and female Canada goose are virtually identical, except for a small difference in weight. Females are smaller.
  7. They spend their summers throughout Canada and the northern United States, but breed in the southern US and northern Mexico.
  8. Canada geese eat mainly plants, but have been known to eat insects and fish. And sometimes they scavenge from garbage cans.
  9. They fly in a v-formation at around 1 km in altitude, but have been known to fly as high as 9 km.
  10. Canada geese are monogamous, mating for life. If one dies, then they can find another mate. They’re very faithful birds.

Let me know in the comments below which facts you didn’t know about or were the most surprised about.

B Is for Bees

The A to Z Challenge continues with the letter B! This time, I talk about bees. It’s springtime, so insects are now coming out. Bees are a very important part of our environment, since they pollinate flowers, and help us grow our plant crops. So, let’s take a look at the video.

Here are the facts, which I mentioned in the video.

  1. There are around 20,000 known species of bee.
  2. The smallest bees are stingless bees that are only 2 mm in length.
  3. The largest bees are the Wallace’s giant bee, a kind of leafcutter bee that grows to 39 mm in length.
  4. Although collection of honey by humans dates back 15,000 years, beekeeping didn’t begin until 4,500 years ago in ancient Egypt.
  5. A bee’s mouthparts are adapted to both chew and suck, having both mandibles and a proboscis.
  6. The explosion of flowering plants 120 million years ago did not coincide with the appearance of bees, which have been around for 100 million years ago, evolving from a type of wasp.
  7. A third of our food supply depends on pollinators, most of which are bees.
  8. Honey isn’t the only thing humans eat. In some countries, the larvae are also eaten.
  9. The decline in bees has been a major worry in recent years, and has been linked to various problems such as pesticides, loss of habitat, and climate change.
  10. It was once said that a bumblebee’s flight was impossible. We now know that the short wing strokes, rotation of the wings, and rapid wing-beats result in sufficient lift. They’re not impossible fliers anymore.

Coming up tomorrow is the letter C. It’s going to be another biological topic. Check back tomorrow!

Week in Review – April 2, 2017

The A to Z Challenge has begun! That’s the biggest news of the week, I’d say. Actually, I had a very busy week of work because it was spring break. Busy days of work resulted in less time for me to spend at home working on the blog and videos. Well, now I have a busy blogging and video-making month ahead of me. Let’s find out what happened.

Reading

I’m now at 72% on Theft of Swords by Michael J. Sullivan. I feel like I’m almost finished, although Avempartha is book two of this series, and only half of this book.

Writing

I may have an idea for getting time to write. We’ll see if it works.

Videos

Just three videos. One for my main channel and two for my science channel. But this week, there will be six on my science channel. The A to Z Challenge has begun, and I’m doing it on both my blog and science channel. Definitely subscribe to my channels if you want to see more.

Patreon

With the amount and type of videos I’m doing on my science channel, I wonder if anything will happen.

Languages

I didn’t study anything.

The Blog

The A to Z Challenge started, as I’ve mentioned before. This will be a busy month, definitely. I also started another blog, one for my science channel. Check out the blog and follow it if you’re interested in science.

Studying

Nothing.

The Next Week’s Goals

This week and for the entire month, I’m dedicated to the A to Z Challenge. Although there won’t be much in the way of books and writing in this challenge, it’ll keep me busy. I hope you’ll enjoy the content I provide this month.

How was your week?