Authors Answer 136 – Living in a Book

Ever want to give up your life and transport yourself into the book you’re reading? Just completely start a new life and become someone new, living in a new place. It’s quite likely a lot of people do. One of the great things about reading books is the ability of the readers to lose themselves in the book. Some are great to live in, others not. What would we choose?

Question 136 – If you could live in any book, which one would you choose?

Eric Wood

Game of Thrones? To live in dark times where I’d probably die? No thanks. Love the books, don’t want to live there. Harry Potter? To be a wizard would fun, most definitely. Maybe in Terry Brooks’s world in “Kingdom For Sale, Sold“. The main character lives in today’s world but finds a portal to a magical kingdom. I like that so I could travel back and forth between worlds.

Gregory S. Close

If I could live in any book… I think I would live in In Siege of Daylight. Not just for self-promotional purposes, but because if anyone knows all the secret ins and outs of the world and could use that to his advantage, it would be ME. I know the history. I know what everyone is thinking. I know the magic system. I know the secret passages, secret societies, secret affairs… I know it all.

I think it could be pretty fun to play in my own sandbox. 🙂

C E Aylett

That is a tricky one. I’m not sure there’s any book where I’d want to live, not with all the awful things that happen to some of the characters! Could you imagine living in Westeros? No thank you very much.

Elizabeth Rhodes

This is a tough one because so many stories are set in the middle of serious conflict for obvious reasons. While that makes for good story, it’s not the safest place to live, and I’m not sure I’d last long in a battle of wits, much less swords or sorcery. The Harry Potter universe probably gets my vote. I can settle down with a nice magical ice cream and cake shop and have little to worry about other than competition with Florean Fortescue.

Tracey Lynn Tobin

Hmmm…that’s actually a really tough question, mainly because of the types of books I read. I wouldn’t want to live in the “A Song of Ice and Fire” series for sure…way too short a lifespan. And I read a lot of Stephen King books, but, I mean…come on. I considered the “Chronicles of Narnia” series, but given the nature of the ending of those books, perhaps not.

I read way too much horror and bloody adventure to answer this question in a way that wouldn’t immediately result in my impending death. Maybe I can just say one of the manga series I read? Yeah, sure, let’s go with that. “Fruits Basket” seems like a safe enough universe to live in. lol

Beth Aman

I think I’d have to say Narnia. ​That series will always have a special place in my heart, and I think Narnia would be (most of the time) a wonderful place to live. ​I grew up reading those books (like many kids grew up reading Harry Potter), and I always wished I could find a secret wardrobe of my own.

D. T. Nova

The ending of The Light of Other Days by Stephen Baxter (based on a synopsis by Arthur C. Clarke) is about as utopian as they come, so I’ll go with that.

Jean Davis

Whichever book I’d pick, it would be the end of the book. Living at the beginning is where everything goes wrong. The stakes are high in the middle, and I’ve already got enough stress to deal with. No, sir. If I’m going to set up house in a book, I’m taking the happy ending section and living out my years there.

Paul B. Spence

Joy of Sex. Just kidding. My books? I’m not sure I’d want to live in the worlds I imagine; they are scary places. Other people’s? I don’t know, maybe Anne McCaffrey’s Pern? Other than Thread (I know!), it seems like a really cool place. I’d really like a fire lizard, too. I’m too old at this point to Impress a dragon, but that would have been even cooler. I’m not sure beyond that. I kind of like where I am now, for the most part.

H. Anthe Davis

I would probably live in my own books, because I know all the hotspots and the nice safe interesting places — whereas in most of the books I’ve read, the concentration has always been on Danger! and Adventure! and Disaster! and I personally don’t want to be anywhere near that stuff. I’ve outgrown the fluffy nice worlds I read as a kid, and definitely don’t want to live in the dark fantasy/military space opera stuff I read now — too many explosions. Though, hey, maybe Beta Colony from Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga… That might be nice…

Jay Dee Archer

Paul took my answer! I’d love to live on Pern, but as it is a long series covering hundreds of years, things change a lot over that time. I would love to be a part of the Dragonsdawn period, which is the very beginning. The chance to explore would be amazing. But the period around The Masterharper of Pern might be nice, even to be taught by Robinton himself. Other than that, I’d love to live in 3001: The Final Odyssey. The technological advances and the ability to travel between the planets would be remarkable. Although I wasn’t thrilled by the book, the way life was seemed peaceful. You could study and explore anything you wanted. Sounds nice!

How about you?

If you could live in any book, which one would you choose? Let us know in the comments section below.

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6 thoughts on “Authors Answer 136 – Living in a Book”

  1. Reblogged this on No Page Left Blank and commented:
    I’ve sure that most of us have read a book that we loved so much, we began to imagine ourselves deep within the world that the author had created. This week over at Authors Answer, we’ve been asked which novel world we would love to live in, given the opportunity.

  2. Reblogged this on Yinin's Thoughts and commented:
    I always pick “Voyage from Yesteryear” by James P. Hogan. In it he describes what I essentially view as the perfect society on the planet Chiron. A high tech, moneyless society where skill essentially replaces currency, although no one keeps track. People’s jobs repay society for keeping them fed, there’s a lot more freedom and flexibility in thier work and less defined “careers”. They also make brief mention of robots doing jobs that people might not be interested in – in one scene a guy who normally runs a power plant is seen painting a house, because he wants to, but also training a robot for the days he doesn’t want to (so you can assume no human unblocks toilets for a job)(…unless they want to). Curiosity and learning is highly encouraged, but in a way to suit the individual so its not always education per se, and robots (both humanoid and not) are highly integrated into the society. To quote Wikipedia: in the absence of conditioning and with limitless robotic labor and fusion power, Chiron has become a post-scarcity economy. Money and material possessions are meaningless to the Chironians and social standing is determined by individual talent, which has resulted in a wealth of art and technology without any hierarchies, central authority or armed conflict.

    The book focuses on a fraction coming from Earth and trying to claim Chiron for themselves and install thier own capitalist values on Chiron. Personally I’d prefer to be Chiron from birth but all the Earthlings get absorbed into Chiron by the end of the novel anyway.

    That’s the book I’d live in 🙂

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